Herman Cain is running for president….

He’s probably one of the       few who can actually do the job and  totally knows what he’s doing or       knows how to learn OTJ! (On The Job!)

Herman Cain is           running for president….
He’s  not a career politician (in           fact he has never held political office). He’s known as a pizza guy,           but there’s a lot more to him. He’s also a computer guy, a banker guy,           and a rocket scientist guy.

Here’s his bio:

  • Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics.
  • Master’s degree in Computer Science.
  • Mathematician for the Navy, where he worked on missile             ballistics (making him a rocket scientist).
  • Computer systems analyst for Coca-Cola.
  • VP of Corporate Data Systems and Services for Pillsbury (this             is the top of the ladder in the computer world, being in charge of             information systems for a major           corporation).

All achieved before reaching the age of 35. Since he           reached the top of the information systems world, he changed           careers!

  • Business Manager. Took charge of Pillsbury’s 400 Burger King             restaurants in the Philadelphia area, which were the company’s             poorest performers in the country. Spent the first nine months             learning the business from the ground up, cooking hamburger and yes,             cleaning toilets. After three years he had turned them into the             company’s best performers.
  • Godfather’s Pizza CEO. Was asked by Pillsbury to take charge             of their Godfather’s Pizza chain (which was on the verge of             bankruptcy). He made it profitable in 14 months.
  • In 1988 he led a buyout of the Godfather’s Pizza chain from             Pillsbury. He was now the owner of a restaurant chain. Again he             reached the top of the ladder of another industry.
  • He was also chairman of the National Restaurant Association             during this time. This is a group that interacts with government on             behalf of the restaurant industry, and it gave him political             experience from the non-politician side.

Having reached the top of a second           industry, he changed careers again!

  • Adviser to the Federal Reserve System. Herman Cain went to             work for the Federal Reserve Banking System advising them on how             monetary policy changes would affect American businesses.
  • Chairman of the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank. He worked             his way up to the chairmanship of a regional Federal Reserve bank.             This is only one step below the chairmanship of the entire Federal             Reserve System (the top banking position in the country). This             position allowed him to see how monetary policy is made from the             inside, and understand the political forces that impact the monetary             system.

After           reaching the top of the banking industry, he changed careers for a           fourth time!

  • Writer and public speaker. He then started to write and speak             on leadership. His books             include Speak as a             Leader, CEO of             Self,Leadership is Common Sense,             and They Think You’re             Stupid.
  • Radio Host. Around 2007—after a remarkable 40 year career—he             started hosting a radio show on WSB in Atlanta (the largest talk             radio station in the country).

He did all this starting from rock bottom (his father           was a chauffeur and his mother was a maid). When you add up his           accomplishments in his life—including reaching the top of three           unrelated industries: information systems, business management, and           banking—

STACK THAT  UP AGAINST THE           ‘COMMUNITY ORGANIZER’….

Herman Cain may have the most impressive resume of           anyone that has run for the presidency in the last half           century.

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A future for drones: Automated killing

A future for drones: Automated killing

By , Published: September 19

One afternoon last fall at Fort Benning, Ga., two model-size planes took off,
climbed to 800 and 1,000 feet, and began criss-crossing the military base in
search of an orange, green and blue tarp.

The automated, unpiloted planes worked on their own, with no human guidance,
no hand on any control.

After 20 minutes, one of the aircraft, carrying a computer that processed
images from an onboard camera, zeroed in on the tarp and contacted the second
plane, which flew nearby and used its own sensors to examine the colorful
object. Then one of the aircraft signaled to an unmanned car on the ground so it
could take a final, close-up look.

Target confirmed.

This successful exercise in autonomous robotics could presage the future of
the American way of war: a day when drones hunt, identify and kill the enemy
based on calculations made by software, not decisions made by humans. Imagine
aerial “Terminators,” minus beefcake and time travel.

The Fort Benning tarp “is a rather simple target, but think of it as a
surrogate,” said Charles E. Pippin, a scientist at the Georgia Tech Research
Institute, which developed the software to run the demonstration. “You can
imagine real-time scenarios where you have 10 of these things up in the air and
something is happening on the ground and you don’t have time for a human to say,
‘I need you to do these tasks.’ It needs to happen faster than that.”

The demonstration laid the groundwork for scientific advances that would
allow drones to search for a human target and then make an identification based
on facial-recognition or other software. Once a match was made, a drone could
launch a missile to kill the target.

Military systems with some degree of autonomy — such as robotic, weaponized
sentries — have been deployed in the demilitarized zone between South and North
Korea and other potential battle areas. Researchers are uncertain how soon
machines capable of collaborating and adapting intelligently in battlefield
conditions will come online. It could take one or two decades, or longer. The
U.S. military is funding numerous research projects on autonomy to develop
machines that will perform some dull or dangerous tasks and to maintain its
advantage over potential adversaries who are also working on such systems.

The killing of terrorism suspects and insurgents by armed drones, controlled
by pilots sitting in bases thousands of miles away in the western United States,
has prompted criticism that the technology makes war too antiseptic. Questions
also have been raised about the legality of drone strikes when employed in
places such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia, which are not at war with the United
States. This debate will only intensify as technological advances enable what
experts call lethal autonomy.

The prospect of machines able to perceive, reason and act in unscripted
environments presents a challenge to the current understanding of international
humanitarian law. The Geneva Conventions require belligerents to use
discrimination and proportionality, standards that would demand that machines
distinguish among enemy combatants, surrendering troops and civilians.

“The deployment of such systems would reflect a paradigm shift and a major
qualitative change in the conduct of hostilities,” Jakob Kellenberger, president
of the International Committee of the Red Cross, said at a conference in Italy
this month. “It would also raise a range of fundamental legal, ethical and
societal issues, which need to be considered before such systems are developed
or deployed.”

Drones flying over Afghanistan, Pakistan and Yemen can already move
automatically from point to point, and it is unclear what surveillance or other
tasks, if any, they perform while in autonomous mode. Even when directly linked
to human operators, these machines are producing so much data that processors
are sifting the material to suggest targets, or at least objects of interest.
That trend toward greater autonomy will only increase as the U.S. military
shifts from one pilot remotely flying a drone to one pilot remotely managing
several drones at once.

But humans still make the decision to fire, and in the case of CIA strikes in
Pakistan, that call rests with the director of the agency. In future operations,
if drones are deployed against a sophisticated enemy, there may be much less
time for deliberation and a greater need for machines that can function on their
own.

The U.S. military has begun to grapple with the implications of emerging
technologies.

“Authorizing a machine to make lethal combat decisions is contingent upon
political and military leaders resolving legal and ethical questions,” according
to an Air Force treatise called Unmanned Aircraft Systems Flight Plan 2009-2047.
“These include the appropriateness of machines having this ability, under what
circumstances it should be employed, where responsibility for mistakes lies and
what limitations should be placed upon the autonomy of such systems.”

In the future, micro-drones will reconnoiter tunnels and buildings, robotic
mules will haul equipment and mobile systems will retrieve the wounded while
under fire. Technology will save lives. But the trajectory of military research
has led to calls for an arms-control regime to forestall any possibility that
autonomous systems could target humans.

In Berlin last year, a group of robotic engineers, philosophers and human
rights activists formed the International Committee for Robot Arms Control
(ICRAC) and said such technologies might tempt policymakers to think war can be
less bloody.

Some experts also worry that hostile states or terrorist organizations could
hack robotic systems and redirect them. Malfunctions also are a problem: In
South Africa in 2007, a semiautonomous cannon fatally shot nine friendly
soldiers.

The ICRAC would like to see an international treaty, such as the one banning
antipersonnel mines, that would outlaw some autonomous lethal machines. Such an
agreement could still allow automated antimissile systems.

“The question is whether systems are capable of discrimination,” said Peter
Asaro, a founder of the ICRAC and a professor at the New School in New York who
teaches a course on digital war. “The good technology is far off, but technology
that doesn’t work well is already out there. The worry is that these systems are
going to be pushed out too soon, and they make a lot of mistakes, and those
mistakes are going to be atrocities.”

Research into autonomy, some of it classified, is racing ahead at
universities and research centers in the United States, and that effort is
beginning to be replicated in other countries, particularly China.

“Lethal autonomy is inevitable,” said Ronald C. Arkin, the author of
“Governing Lethal Behavior in Autonomous Robots,” a study that was funded by the
Army Research Office.

Arkin believes it is possible to build ethical military drones and robots,
capable of using deadly force while programmed to adhere to international
humanitarian law and the rules of engagement. He said software can be created
that would lead machines to return fire with proportionality, minimize
collateral damage, recognize surrender, and, in the case of uncertainty,
maneuver to reassess or wait for a human assessment.

In other words, rules as understood by humans can be converted into
algorithms followed by machines for all kinds of actions on the battlefield.

“How a war-fighting unit may think — we are trying to make our systems behave
like that,” said Lora G. Weiss, chief scientist at the Georgia Tech Research
Institute.

Others, however, remain skeptical that humans can be taken out of the loop.

“Autonomy is really the Achilles’ heel of robotics,” said Johann Borenstein,
head of the Mobile Robotics Lab at the University of Michigan. “There is a lot
of work being done, and still we haven’t gotten to a point where the smallest
amount of autonomy is being used in the military field. All robots in the
military are remote-controlled. How does that sit with the fact that autonomy
has been worked on at universities and companies for well over 20 years?”

Borenstein said human skills will remain critical in battle far into the
future.

“The foremost of all skills is common sense,” he said. “Robots don’t have
common sense and won’t have common sense in the next 50 years, or however long
one might want to guess.”

 

Putin says U.S. is “parasite” on global economy

Putin says U.S. is “parasite” on global economy

Photo
5:45pm EDT

By Maria Tsvetkova

LAKE SELIGER, Russia (Reuters) – Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin accused the United States Monday of living beyond its means “like a parasite” on the global economy and said dollar dominance was a threat to the financial markets.

“They are living beyond their means and shifting a part of the weight of their problems to the world economy,” Putin told the pro-Kremlin youth group Nashi while touring its lakeside summer camp some five hours drive north of Moscow.

“They are living like parasites off the global economy and their monopoly of the dollar,” Putin said at the open-air meeting with admiring young Russians in what looked like early campaigning before parliamentary and presidential polls.

US President Barack Obama earlier announced a last-ditch deal to cut about $2.4 trillion from the U.S. deficit over a decade, avoid a crushing debt default and stave off the risk that the nation’s AAA credit rating would be downgraded.

The deal initially soothed anxieties and led Russian stocks to jump to three-month highs, but jitters remained over the possibility of a credit downgrade.

“Thank god,” Putin said, “that they had enough common sense and responsibility to make a balanced decision.”

But Putin, who has often criticized the United States’ foreign exchange policy, noted that Russia holds a large amount of U.S. bonds and treasuries.

“If over there (in America) there is a systemic malfunction,

this will affect everyone,” Putin told the young Russians.

“Countries like Russia and China hold a significant part of their reserves in American securities … There should be other reserve currencies.”

U.S.-Russian ties soured during Putin’s 2000-2008 presidency but have warmed significantly since his protégé and successor President Dmitry Medvedev responded to Obama’s stated desire for a “reset” in bilateral relations.

EARLY CAMPAIGNING?

Casually dressed in khaki trousers and a striped white shirt, Putin flew by helicopter to the tented camp as part of a string of appearances that are being closely watched in the run-up to the elections.

He did not say whether he plans a return to the Kremlin or will stand aside for Medvedev, his partner in Russia’s leadership tandem, to run for a second term.

But young people crowding round Putin, caught up in the campaigning spirit created by huge portraits of Putin hung from trees, were not shy about saying who they wanted as president.

“Russia’s next president will be small, bald and look like Putin,” 17-year-old Ilya Mzokov joked with reporters. Asked why Medvedev was not paying a visit to the summer camp, he said: “Only serious people come here.”

Youngsters chanted Putin’s name and applauded his remarks as he strolled round the camp, where US-style business seminars, extreme sports and political mudslinging were among the topics on offer.

Putin, whose macho image appeals to many Russians, briefly swung himself up the first half of a climbing wall, filmed by a gaggle of state television cameras.

Nashi, which means “Our People,” was created by the Kremlin to counter popular dissent after youth activism helped topple a pro-Moscow government in Ukraine’s 2005 Orange revolution.

The group has worked to spread a personality cult around Putin and regularly campaigns against Kremlin critics.

Opinion polls show Putin, still widely viewed as the country’s paramount leader, retains near 70 percent approval.

But his United Russia party is trying to reverse a slide in popularity before December parliamentary polls, hoping to use a strong showing there to help Putin in the March 2012 presidential vote.

(Writing by Alissa de Carbonnel; editing by Tim Pearce)

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Criminal Leaks

 

Criminal Leaks

 

Posted By Rich
Trzupek
On November 30, 2010 @ 12:47 am

When WikiLeaks
released hundreds of thousands of classified documents involving the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in October, the Obama
administration condemned Julian Assange’s rogue organization for putting the
lives of the military personnel and important informants at risk. While the
alleged source of the leak, Pfc. Bradley Manning, was taken into custody, there
was no push for punitive action against WikiLeaks itself. Now Assange has
stepped over the line: he’s embarrassed the diplomatic corps and the
politicians behind it. Sunday’s release of over 250,000 State Department
documents sent the administration and politicians on both sides of the aisle into
a frenzy
[1].

“This
disclosure is not just an attack on America’s foreign policy
interests. It is an attack on the international community — the alliances and
partnerships, the conversations and negotiations that safeguard global security
and advance economic prosperity,” Secretary of State Clinton said. White House
Press Secretary Robert Gibbs called the release “a crime,” and Attorney General
Eric Holder said the Justice Department had launched “an active, ongoing,
criminal investigation” into WikiLeaks activities.

Assange’s
willingness to disclose state secrets is reprehensible in any form. But, should
a peek into the misty backrooms of international diplomacy cause more outrage
than putting the lives of Americans serving in uniform, and the brave Iraqis
and Afghans who help them, at risk? Such is the world we live in and perhaps we
should be grateful, if the administration is finally serious about going after
WikiLeaks in some meaningful way. Representative Peter King suggested that
WikiLeaks should be designated a terror organization and, under the old rules,
it would be hard to argue against King’s point. The Bush Doctrine said that
anyone who knowingly harbors or aids terrorists would be treated as an enemy.
“You’re either with us or against us,” Bush said, and viewed through that
simple lens, there’s no doubt which side WikiLeaks comes out on. Unfortunately,
the Obama administration, parroting the progressive point of view, cannot abide
such a clear line of demarcation. The president has effectively added a third
category: you’re with us, you’re against us, or you’re a misguided soul engaged
in criminal mischief that might seem a little like terrorism but really
shouldn’t be handled that way.

Yet, labeling
this latest document dump a crime is at least a step in the right direction for
this administration, although hoping to drag Assange and his cronies into court
falls far short of the kind of aggressive action needed to end the national
security threat that WikiLeaks represents. It is perhaps more interesting to
consider what about this particular round of disclosures caused the administration
to up the ante. Could it be that many
of the documents
[2] reveal that the Obama administration is
inept and disingenuous when it comes to managing foreign affairs?

We now know, for example, that the Obama administration put pressure on
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to stop arms shipments to Hezbollah. Assad
promised action, but delivered none, and Hezbollah continues to grow in power
as a result. We also know that Saudi Arabian King Abdullah, who is very worried
about what would happen in the region if Iran
gets the bomb, urged the president to bomb Iranian nuclear facilities. On the
other hand, the documents confirm what has long been an open-secret: that
wealthy Saudis remain the chief financiers of Sunni jihadists, including
al-Qaeda.

America’s tenuous, troubling
relationship with China is also revealed in
the documents. In late December 2009, Internet powerhouse Google
was the target
[3] of a massive and sophisticated cyber-attack.
Google said that the purpose of the attack was to gather information about
Chinese dissidents and their supporters. Neither Google nor the United States government was
inclined to identify the source of the attack. The identity of the perpetrator
seemed rather obvious, for who else but the Chinese government would be
motivated to take the time to develop malware that went after such a narrow,
particular target? Independent web security firms like VeriSign’s iDefense
definitively concluded that China was to blame, but the
administration dithered and the press largely ignored the story. We now know
that the Obama administration was fully aware that China went after Google and
that the administration deliberately chose to ignore the attack, presumably out
of fear of offending our huge trading partner.

It also
appears, according
to some Internet experts
[4], that the United States narrowly averted
disaster this summer when a targeted, Stuxnet-like virus originating in China was caught and
disabled before it could do damage to our nation’s
industrial infrastructure. This was yet another story that quietly
disappeared within the haze of diplomacy, even though the consequences of the
virus’s success would have been truly catastrophic.

WikiLeaks thus remains a most dangerous enemy. Julian Assange’s
determination to publish every bit of classified information he can lay his
hands on endangers both the West’s ability to combat terror and America’s
efforts to use the subtleties of diplomacy to coax erstwhile enemies into
action. Which agenda is more important is a matter of opinion. But, there can
be little doubt that WikiLeaks, if left unchecked, will continue to upset the
global order in a world dominated by a single superpower. How America
deals with WikiLeaks, or doesn’t deal with it, may well define the Obama
administration’s legacy when it comes to the continuing war on terror.


Article
printed from FrontPage Magazine: http://frontpagemag.com

URL to
article: http://frontpagemag.com/2010/11/30/criminal-leaks/

URLs in this
post:

[1] into a
frenzy: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/11/29/administration-vows-crack-leaks-document-dump/

[2] many of
the documents: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/29/world/29cables.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

[3] Google
was the target: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/11/29/wikileaks-dump-reveals-ch_n_789042.html

[4]
according to some Internet experts: http://arstechnica.com/security/news/2010/01/researchers-identify-command-servers-behind-google-attack.ars

 

The War on Sarah Palin Really is a War on Conservatives

The War on Sarah Palin Really is a War on Conservatives

2010 June 26

It’s getting rather old, but the Left continues to attack one of the most influential conservative women alive today: Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin.

When she was invited to speak at Stanislaus university in California last Friday, leftist students immediately went through trash cans, trying to figure out how much Palin was being paid. They organized protests, asked their friends of the mainstream media for help, and altogether did their best to ruin what eventually became the most successful fundraising dinner in the university’s history.

The material recovered by the students, which detailed perks such as first-class airfare for two and deluxe hotel accommodations, prompted California Attorney General Jerry Brown to launch an investigation into the finances of the university’s foundation arm and allegations that the nonprofit violated public disclosure laws.

Would they have done the same thing if Palin was a leftist? Have you ever heard of progressive students protesting against the speaking fees of, say, Al Gore or Hillary Clinton? No, of course you haven’t. That’s because this is not about fairness or money but about Palin’s ideology. She is a conservative, and that’s reason enough for leftist students to ruin her evening and to disgrace the university that invited her.

This non-scandal once again proves that conservatives are engaged in a political war with progressives. Too often conservative pundits and politicians think we should be ‘civilized’. We should not, because our enemies certainly are not either. When you are engaged in a war all that matters is that you win. If this means you have to fight dirty every now and then, so be it. The Left understands this, too many on the Right do not. Let Palin’s treatment at Stanislaus serve as a wake up call for those who still believe that manners matter.

Obama: ‘You’ve got a lot of golf courses here, don’t you?

Obama: ‘You’ve got a lot of golf courses here, don’t you?’

J.C. Arenas

President Obama is visiting Canada for the G8 and G20 meetings. Looks like he has something else on his mind:

When U.S. President Barack Obama stepped off his helicopter in Huntsville on Friday, the first thing he said was, “You’ve got a lot of golf courses here, don’t you?” Industry Minister Tony Clement told the National Post in an exclusive interview.
“I told him, ‘We would really recommend and love it if you could come back here with Michelle and the kids at some point – we think you’d really love it here,'” Minister Clement said on the sidewalk of Huntsville’s Main Street, in his home riding. “I think I’ve planted a seed in the President’s mind.”

Chaplain brings Muslim perspective to Camp Pendleton ???????? Balderdash

Chaplain brings Muslim perspective to Camp Pendleton

By MARK WALKER – mlwalker@nctimes.com

Balderdash. He either doesn’t understand the history and fundamental nature of the religion he purports to revere and follow, or he’s useful idiot contributing to the ‘soft Jihad.’ Either way, if the global caliphate scheme were ever to succeed, this guy would be among thousands of expendables who helped bring it about.

 | Posted: June 19, 2010 5:34 pm | (15) 

   

Camp Pendleton’s Asif Balbale is one of only four Muslum chaplains in the U.S. Navy. He says part of his job is to instruct troops in Islamic traditions. (Photo by Bill Wechter – Staff photographer)

The newest pastor at Camp Pendleton drives a small sedan with a piece of scripture emblazoned on the rear window: “If you see something good, may God bless it and keep it from evil eyes.”

The words are written in Arabic, a clue that Asif Balbale is no ordinary chaplain.

The slight-framed Murrieta resident is the only Muslim chaplain among 60 members of the clergy at the sprawling Marine Corps base and one of only four Muslims in the U.S. Navy chaplain corps, which numbers more than 680.

As the only imam on the West Coast, Balbale’s role goes beyond typical pastoral care.

“Part of my job is to educate people on what it means to be a Muslim,” the 30-year-old said during an interview at his office at the base’s Amphibious Assault Schools Battalion.
 

“There have been a lot of stereotypes and negativity, and it is essential to build bridges. Part of that is teaching my faith,” he said.
 

The instruction includes teaching Marines some of the religion’s basics. That includes the five pillars of Islam —- declaration of faith, prayer, charity, fasting during the holy month of Ramadan and a once-in-a-lifetime pilgrimage to Mecca, the holiest site in Islamic life.

“These are among the kinds of things I tell people when they are going to Iraq or Afghanistan,” he said. “Part of how we are fighting these wars is an effort to win hearts and minds, and that is where I play a role in teaching what the culture is like and how to respect the people.”

He tells the troops that Islam does not condone suicide bombing, putting women and children at risk or forbidding girls from attending school —- all acts carried out by the Taliban and its supporters.

“None of that is in line with Islam,” said Balbale, a father of one child with another on the way.
 

The troops he’s encountered since arriving at Camp Pendleton in April have been a little curious about his faith, but very welcoming, he said.

“It’s a new experience for them, but all most Marines care about is whether I am going to help them,” Balbale said.
 

9/11 a defining moment

An Indian by birth, Balbale grew up in southern Kuwait, where his parents moved for jobs and where they still live.

The family was forced to flee that country during the first Gulf War, eventually arriving at a refugee camp in Jordan before going to India.

They stayed there until returning to Kuwait in 1993, two years after the war ended.
 

Devout while growing up, Balbale was nonetheless on course to become a petroleum engineer, leaving Kuwait in 2000 for the University of Idaho.
 

He later transferred to Montana Tech, and was in Butte when al-Qaida terrorists attacked the U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001.
 

He and his Muslim friends were “shellshocked,” Balbale said.

“We were worried about what it was going to look like for us, what was it going to mean to be a Muslim in this country?” he said. “For me, it was like, ‘OK, what can I do to help this nation?'”
 

He ultimately decided to join the military as a demonstration of his commitment to his adopted homeland, and his first stop was an Army recruiting office in September 2004.

“But I was underweight —- I was 96 pounds soaking wet,” he said.

That was more than 10 pounds under the Army’s minimum weight standard. “So I went to see a Navy recruiter, and he said, ‘We only need 94 pounds.'”

Through his military service, Balbale was able to expedite the process of becoming a U.S. citizen, gaining that status in 1995.

He would go on to spend three years as a machinist’s mate, and during a deployment aboard the San Diego-based USS Boxer he began his turn toward the chaplaincy.

Balbale, who is 5 feet 4 inches tall and has filled out to about 124 pounds, was intending to apply for officer candidate school when he mistakenly sent an e-mail to a chaplain recruiter.

That led to an extended conversation with the recruiter, and a subsequent meeting in Okinawa with a Muslim chaplain.

He came to believe that heart-to-heart talks with shipmates were readying him for the ministry.

“I was just being a friend, but I later realized it was God preparing me,” Balbale said.

In 2007, he entered the chaplain candidate program and eventually became a lieutenant.

He completed his religious training by earning a master’s degree in spiritual care and pastoral counseling at the Claremont School of Theology in Los Angeles County.

Balbale isn’t the only unique religious leader at the base.

Camp Pendleton also is home to the Navy’s only Buddhist chaplain, Jeanette Shin, who is in Afghanistan with the 1st Marine Logistics Group.

Country, God and religion

Much like Shin, Balbale adds a more worldly view to the base ministry, said Navy Capt. Ollis Mozon, commanding base chaplain.

“Instead of us Protestant or Catholic chaplains telling people what we think we know about Islam, he gives us the true perspective,” Mozon said.

Aside from a gold crescent attached to his lapel, Balbale’s religion is identifiable by his cap —- a white knitted kufi worn by many Muslims.

Balbale will spend the next three years at Camp Pendleton. Although he’s assigned to a training battalion that does not deploy, he eventually could be part of a combat unit and sent overseas.
 

In the meantime, he’s reaching out to the estimated 200 Muslim troops at Camp Pendleton to let them know he is there and will soon launch a weekly service at a base chapel.
 

He turns aside teasing by friends who remind him he could have left the Navy and earned a healthy income as a petroleum engineer.

“God has put me in the place where he wants me to be,” he said. “I can’t think of any job like this one where I can serve my country, my God and my religion all at once.”

Call staff writer Mark Walker at 760-740-3529.