Mexico: Stop Sending Back Our Criminals

Mexico: Stop Sending Back Our Criminals

September 27th, 2010

Judicial Watch

In a flabbergasting request, a coalition of Mexican lawmakers has asked the United States to stop deporting illegal immigrants who have been convicted of serious crimes in American courts.

The preposterous demand was made at a recent southern California conference in which the mayors of four Mexican cities that border the U.S. gathered to discuss cross-border issues. The only American mayor who attended the biannual event was San Diego’s Jerry Sanders, evidently because his city hosted it this year at a fancy downtown hotel.

Among the cross-border topics that were addressed at the conference was the deportation of Mexican citizens who have committed violent crimes in the U.S. The felons are persona non grata in their communities, say the mayors of Tijuana, Ciudad Juarez, Nogales, and Nuevo Laredo. They want U.S. officials to stem the deportation of such convicts to their cities, according to a local newspaper report that covered the conference.

Read more.

Top AZ Paper: Narco-Insurgents Use Kids To Bring Drugs Across U.S.-Mexican Border

Top AZ Paper: Narco-Insurgents Use Kids To Bring Drugs Across U.S.-Mexican Border

July 5th, 2010 Posted By Pat Dollard.

aleqm5ijlg53xkao0-sbhxspm1fxg5ednq

Arizona Republic:

On May 9, a 15-year-old girl walked into Arizona through the San Luis port of entry, near Yuma, with 5 pounds of marijuana strapped around her belly.

She got busted by Customs and Border Protection officers.

Later that same day, a 16-year-old boy tried the same thing with 2 pounds of cannabis taped to his legs. He, too, was arrested.

The marijuana, with a combined street value of $72,000, was confiscated.

The juveniles – both U.S. citizens – were turned over to police.

drug-war-bodies

But others keep taking their place.

In the past two years, Homeland Security officials have witnessed a disturbing development along the Mexican border: kid smugglers.

“It’s going up,” said Michael Lowrie, a public-affairs agent for the U.S. Border Patrol. “Not a whole lot, but more than we’ve seen in, well, pretty much ever.”

The Border Patrol does not keep data on juvenile drug runners caught trying to sneak into Arizona through the desert and mountains. But Customs and Border Protection records show 130 minors were caught attempting to bring drugs through entry ports from Sonora into Arizona during fiscal 2009, an 83 percent increase over the previous year.

Teresa Small, a Customs and Border Protection spokeswoman in San Luis, said narcotics organizations – always on the lookout for ways to penetrate increasing border security – are recruiting American teens with claims that they won’t face major punishment if they are caught.

“Drug-trafficking organizations lead them to believe they will not have a substantial sentence,” Small said. “But they’re actually telling them a lie.”

In fact, prison terms are not uncommon for teen smugglers.

The problem escalated last year to a point where federal and local authorities created programs to warn Yuma County students about the dangers and consequences of drug smuggling. The federal campaign includes a presentation by border agents and a video with arrest re-enactments.

Meanwhile, a mock-sentencing program created by the Yuma County Superior Court has been presented at San Luis High School and a local after-school jobs center. Judge Maria Elena Cruz said she has noticed a surge of young smugglers who are stunned when she orders them incarcerated.

Cruz said her presentation, featuring a real prosecutor and defense attorney, ends with a teenager sentenced to prison. “We had parents and juveniles crying,” she added. “It was very, very effective.”

Small said most of the youthful offenders are Americans with family members in Mexico. She said port officers generally refer suspects to local authorities for prosecution under Arizona law, rather than to the federal justice system.

“One thing for sure: They will get the hardest punishment possible,” Small said.

Lowrie said cartels may be recruiting juveniles because the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Arizona has cracked down on so-called drug mules, low-level couriers who try to smuggle narcotics through ports or carry loads through the backcountry. Until prosecutorial staffing was beefed up recently, those runners were not charged federally unless they were caught with hundreds of pounds of marijuana.

Roger Nelson, chief deputy for criminal cases at the Yuma County Attorney’s Office, said young smugglers face a strong likelihood of prison time.

Virtually all 17-year-olds are prosecuted as adults, he said, as are many 15- and 16-year-olds. Importation of drugs is a Class 2 felony that carries a presumptive sentence of five years. In plea agreements, Nelson said, prosecutors often reduce the charge to attempted importation, a Class 3 felony that carries a presumptive sentence of 3 1/2 years but allows for probation.

Nelson said juvenile defendants who strap small amounts of marijuana to their bodies sometimes are granted probation, but those who drive into inspection stations with larger loads often wind up behind bars.

Yuma County prosecutors handled 22 cases in 2009 and 15 during the first five months of this year.

Juvenile cases in federal court are confidential, so limited information is available on the fate of defendants there.

Shelley Clemens, chief assistant U.S. attorney in Tucson, said a child convicted of delinquency in the federal system may be incarcerated for a maximum of five years, or until age 21.

Although most of the juvenile smugglers are American citizens, Clemens said those referred for federal prosecution usually are Mexican nationals who quickly plead guilty. After conviction and completion of court-imposed sentences, she said, they are deported.

Still, the cases pile up.

On June 24, Customs and Border Protection reported, a 16-year-old American boy was arrested at the San Luis port of entry with cocaine taped to his leg. Two days later, a 17-year-old Douglas girl, also a U.S. citizen, was caught trying to smuggle a purse full of bullets southbound into Mexico, where firearms and ammunition are outlawed.

“They think they’re going to get away with it or get a slap on the wrist,” Lowrie said. “It’s a growing trend.”

The Second Mexican-American War: Mexican Insurgent Says US Consulate Was Infiltrated

The Second Mexican-American War: Mexican Insurgent Says US Consulate Was Infiltrated

July 2nd, 2010 Posted By Pat Dollard.

Mexico Drug War

MEXICO CITY (AP) – The drug-cartel enforcer told an unsettling story: A woman who worked in the Mexican border’s biggest U.S. consulate had helped a rival gang obtain American visas. And for that, the enforcer said, he ordered her killed.

Nonsense, says a U.S. official, who said Friday the motive for the slaying remains unknown.

The employee, Lesley Enriquez, and two other people connected to the U.S. consulate in the city of Ciudad Juarez were killed March 13 in attacks that raised concerns that Americans were being caught up in drug-related border violence.

Jesus Ernesto Chavez, whose arrest was announced Friday, confessed to ordering the killings, said Ramon Pequeno, the head of anti-narcotics for the Federal Police. Pequeno said Chavez leads a band of hit men for a street gang tied to the Juarez cartel.

Enriquez and her husband were killed in Ciudad Juarez, across the border from El Paso, Texas, as they drove toward a border crossing. Chavez also is accused in a nearly simultaneous attack that killed the husband of a Mexican employee of the consulate.

Pequeno said Chavez told police that Enriquez was targeted because she helped provide visas to a rival gang.

A U.S. federal official familiar with the investigation said Friday that after the killings, U.S. officials investigated possible corruption involving Enriquez and found none. The official was not authorized to speak about the case and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The official said the motive behind the killing remains unclear.

Officials with the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City declined to comment. At the U.S. Justice Department in Washington, spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler law enforcement “continues to work closely with our Mexican counterparts to bring to justice individuals involved in these murders.”

U.S. Embassy officials previously said that Enriquez was never in a position to provide visas and worked in a section that provides basic services to U.S. citizens in Mexico.

Mexican police provided no further details from Chavez’s confession on how Enriquez might have helped provide visas to a drug gang.

Enriquez was four months pregnant when she and her husband, Arthur H. Redelfs, were killed by gunmen who opened fire on their vehicle after the couple left a children’s birthday party. Their 7-month-old daughter was found wailing in the back seat.

Jorge Alberto Salcido, the husband of a Mexican employee of the consulate, also was killed by gunmen after leaving the same event in a separate vehicle.

Chavez told police that gunmen opened fire on Salcido because the two cars were the same color and the hit men did not know which one Enriquez was in, Pequeno said.

Investigators also have looked at whether Redelfs may have been targeted because of his work at an El Paso County jail that holds several members of the Barrio Azteca, the gang believed to be responsible for the attacks. Pequeno said Chavez belongs to Barrio Azteca, which works for the Juarez cartel on both sides of the border.

In March, U.S. federal, state and local law enforcement officers swept through El Paso, picking up suspected members of the gang in an effort to find new leads in the killings. A suspect detained in Mexico shortly after the shooting confessed to acting as a lookout as the Azteca gang supposedly hunted down Redelfs, but he was never charged and was released without explanation.

Officials also have speculated that both attacks could have been a case of mistaken identity.

More than 23,000 people have been killed in Mexico’s drug-related violence since President Felipe Calderon launched an all-out offensive against drug gangs in 2006.

Much of the violence stems from rival drug- and migrant-smuggling gangs vying for power, including a firefight Thursday that left 21 people dead and at least six others wounded about 12 miles (20 kilometers) from the Arizona border.

The shootings took place in a sparsely populated area near the border city of Nogales that is considered a prime corridor for migrant and drug smuggling. Sonora state prosecutors said all those killed were gang members.

Gangs often fight for control of the routes they use to smuggle drugs and people across the border, and also abduct migrants from each other. The violence near the Arizona border is one reason given for a controversial law passed in April requiring police there to ask people about their immigration status in certain situations.

The turf war between the Juarez and Sinaloa cartels, meanwhile, has made Ciudad Juarez one of the deadliest cities in the world. More than 2,600 people were killed last year in the city of 1.3 million people.

Chavez, 41, served five years in a Louisiana prison on drug distribution charges, according to Mexico’s central intelligence database. He was detained in Mexico in 2008 by the Mexican army on drug trafficking allegations and released, only to be promoted within the Azteca gang, Federal Police said.

Chavez was arrested along with five suspected gang associates who are accused of carrying out killings or providing support. Six assault rifles, a sub-machine gun and ammunition were seized.

Aside from the killings related to the U.S. consulate, Mexican police say Chavez also confessed to participating in the Jan. 31 killing of 15 youths at a party that was mistaken as a gathering of drug-gang rivals. That massacre fueled outrage over innocents killed.

The State Department, meanwhile, announced new travel restrictions Friday for U.S. government employees working away from the border in Mexico and Central America. As of July 15, they and their families are barred from crossing anywhere along Texas’ border, north or south, because of safety concerns. The U.S. government continues to urge Americans to exercise extreme caution or defer unnecessary travel to certain parts of Mexico.

Deadly Border Shootout Leaves Bullet Holes In El Paso City Hall

Deadly Border Shootout Leaves Bullet Holes In El Paso City Hall

July 1st, 2010 Posted By Pat Dollard.

dead_guerrilla

When the first American child is killed by random gunfire, let me hear Obama tell us that border violence is receding, as he tried to do today…

EL PASO, Texas (AP) – A deadly shootout between gunmen and Mexican police that left seven bullet holes in El Paso City Hall has renewed calls for tighter border security, even as local authorities say little can be done to stop stray bullets from crossing the U.S.-Mexican border.

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott wrote President Barack Obama on Wednesday to say Tuesday’s “cross-border gunfire” was more proof that the state “is under constant assault from illegal activity threatening a porous border.”

Mexican authorities said the shootout began between police and armed suspects in Ciudad Juarez – a city plagued by drug violence just across the Rio Grande from El Paso – as officers were trying to investigate a vehicle with no license plates in a border-area parking lot within view of El Paso City Hall.

Police and the suspects exchanged at least 40 shots, and El Paso police believe seven of those bullets flew over the border – traveling more than a half-mile – and hit city hall. No one was injured in El Paso, but a Mexican federal police officer and a bystander in Juarez were killed.

In his letter to Obama, Abbott said “good fortune” prevented any injuries when a single bullet crashed through a ninth-floor office window but insisted the incident was evidence of the need for more border security.

“Luck and good fortune are not effective border enforcement policies,” Abbott wrote. “The shocking reality of cross-border gunfire proves the cold reality: American lives are at risk.”

The White House did not immediately respond to questions about Abbott’s letter.

More than 5,000 people have been killed in Juarez since the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels started fighting for control of the sprawling border city in 2008. Daylight shootings have become commonplace.

Despite concerns of spillover violence from Mexico’s bloody fight against drug cartels, many border cities, including El Paso, have remained largely unscathed.

So far this year, El Paso has recorded one homicide, compared to more than 1,300 killings in Juarez.

El Paso City Manager Joyce Wilson shrugged off suggestions that more security could prevent stray bullets from flying across the border.

“A (multimillion-dollar) wall didn’t stop bullets,” Wilson said, referring to the border fence built during the Bush administration.

“It’s an unfortunate reality of where we are,” she said.

Abbott is among a growing number of politicians from around the country arguing for more border security.

Earlier this year, Arizona rancher Robert Krentz was shot to death in a remote stretch of desert on his property about 20 miles from the border. Investigators have said footprints led from the scene of that shooting south to the border.

Krentz’s killing prompted an outcry over border security. Lawmakers in Arizona later passed a bill giving local police authority to ask about someone’s immigration status in certain situations.

Obama has ordered up to 1,200 National Guard soldiers to the border

21 killed in Mexican gang shootout near US border

21 killed in Mexican gang shootout near US border

By FELIPE LARIOS GAXIOLA (AP) – 41 minutes ago

HERMOSILLO, Mexico — A massive gun battle between rival drug and migrant trafficking gangs near the U.S. border Thursday left 21 people dead and at least six others wounded, prosecutors said.

The fire fight occurred in a sparsely populated area about 12 miles (20 kilometers) from the Arizona border, near the city of Nogales, that is considered a prime corridor for immigrant and drug smuggling.

The Sonora state Attorney General’s Office said in a statement that nine people were captured by police at the scene of the shootings, six of whom had been wounded in the confrontation. Eight vehicles and seven weapons were also seized.

All of the victims were believed to be members of the gangs.

The shootings occurred near a dirt road between the hamlets of Tubutama and Saric, in an area often used by traffickers.

Gangs often fight for control of trafficking routes and sometimes steal “shipments” of undocumented migrants from each other, but seldom have they staged such mass gun battles.

Gang violence near the Arizona border has led to calls from officials in the U.S. state for greater control of the border and is one reason given for a controversial law passed in April requiring Arizona police to ask people about their immigration status in certain situations.

In a city on another part of the U.S. border, gunmen killed an assistant attorney general for Chihuahua state and one of her bodyguards.

After being chased by armed assailants through the darkened streets of Ciudad Juarez, the vehicle carrying Sandra Salas Garcia and two bodyguards was riddled with bullets Wednesday night.

Arturo Sandoval, a spokesman for the Attorney General’s Office, said the second bodyguard was seriously wounded.

Salas was responsible for evaluating the work of prosecutors and special investigations units in Chihuahua.

Drug violence has killed more than 4,300 people in recent years in Ciudad Juarez, which borders El Paso, Texas.

More than 23,000 people have been killed by drug violence since late 2006, when President Felipe Calderon began deploying thousands of troops and federal police to drug hot spots.

The threat of illegal alien amnesty-by-executive order

The threat of illegal alien amnesty-by-executive order

By Michelle Malkin  •  June 23, 2010 10:07 AM

NumbersUSA posted a letter on Monday from GOP Sen. Grassley and seven other Republican Senators challenging the White House on rumors of illegal alien-amnesty-by-executive order. The gist of it:

We understand that there’s a push for your Administration to develop a plan to unilaterally extend either deferred action or parole to millions of illegal aliens in the United States. We understand that the Administration may include aliens who have willfully overstayed their visas or filed for benefits knowing that they will not be eligible for a status for years to come. We understand that deferred action and parole are discretionary actions reserved for individual cases that present unusual, emergent or humanitarian circumstances. Deferred action and parole were not intended to be used to confer a status or offer protection to large groups of illegal aliens, even if the agency claims that they look at each case on a “case-by-case” basis.

While we agree our immigration laws need to be fixed, we are deeply concerned about the potential expansion of deferred action or parole for a large illegal alien population. While deferred action and parole are Executive Branch authorities, they should not be used to circumvent Congress’ constitutional authority to legislate immigration policy, particularly as it relates to the illegal population in the United States.

This administration has accomplished its major policy agenda items through force, fiat, and fraud. Immigration will be no different.

More to the point, as I’ve reported many times and in-depth in my blog posts, colum ns, and books, open-borders activists and open-borders politicians have accomplished illegal alien amnesty-by-special order with almost no grass-roots resistance for years.

Both the Bush and Obama administrations support non-enforcement orders on deportation.

Both Republicans and Democrats have sponsored “special relief” bills to grant amnesty to illegal alien criminals. Remember:

How Congress gives special relief to convicted murderers, smugglers, and other alien law-breakers
By Michelle Malkin • June 11, 2007 01:00 PM

Are you aware that deportable aliens can circumvent immigration laws with the help of your member of Congress? Are you aware that more than 50 bills have been introduced in Congress this year that would grant special, private relief to individual immigrants fighting deportation? It’s instant amnesty through special legislation. And it’s been happening for years under the radar. Past and present beneficiaries have included smugglers, illegal aliens, and now a convicted murderer wanted in his home country for engaging in terrorist activity and participating in an assassination plot that left a prime minister and dozens of his family members dead.

Both political parties remain clueless or indifferent to the deportation abyss that affords illegal aliens countless appeals and de facto, endless amnesty.

As I first pointed out in Invasion eight years ago, comprehensive immigration ENFORCEMENT reform won’t come from Washington until Americans outside the Beltway start doing it themselves.

The revolt is well underway.

***

Send the White House your two cents on illegal alien amnesty-by-executive order here.

***

Related:

As Naked Emperor News highlights in 2004 video, Obama has openly advocated trading border security for amnesty. He’s not the only one in Washington to embrace this feckless trade-off:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMD7rjlHKFQ&feature=player_embedded

A Mexican drug cartel has threatened Nogales police officers, saying they will be targeted for retribution if they conduct off-duty busts

Posted by Jim Hoft on Tuesday, June 22, 2010, 5:43 AM

The Mexican drug cartel warned Arizona police officers this week to look the other way when they are off duty or face sniper fire.
These foreign criminals are now openly threatening our law enforcement officers here in America.

Mexican Drug Cartel Threatens Nogales, AZ Police Officers with Snipers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RWtW0AjO7M&feature=player_embedded

The Sierra Vista Herald reported, via Free Republic:

A Mexican drug cartel has threatened Nogales police officers, saying they will be targeted for retribution if they conduct off-duty busts.

Nogales Police Chief Jeffrey Kirkham told the Nogales International late last week that the threats stemmed from an incident approximately two weeks ago, when off-duty officers surprised marijuana smugglers while riding horseback in an unincorporated border area east of town. The officers seized part of the drug load, and the smugglers were able to flee back into Mexico with the other part.

“As a result of that,” Kirkham said, “our officers have received threats from the cartel that they are to look the other way if they are off duty, or they will be targeted by a sniper or by other means.

NPD learned of the threats through informants, he said.

Following the threats, Kirkham said, NPD notified the Border Patrol and other federal law enforcement agencies, which responded by stepping up manpower and surveillance in the area where the off-duty bust occurred. In addition, Kirkham met with his officers to advise them of the threats and to authorize them to take precautions, including wearing firearms while off duty.

“The Nogales Police Department will not be intimidated,” he said.

Kirkham said the threats highlighted the need for more federal law enforcement at the border. “This has nothing to do with SB 1070 or illegal immigration,” he said, “it has to do with narco-trafficking and the violence of the cartels.”

Can’t control the criminal? Control the law-abiding

Can’t control the criminal? Control the law-abiding

Isaac Martin

It  was an edge-of-the-radar-screen news story that I happen to notice, surfing the Fox News web site. The story was about the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, which is located west of Douglas, Arizona and its southern boundary is adjacent to the Mexican border.

According to the report, and refuge website, 3500 acres have been posted off limits to visitors, due to the presence of drug and human smuggling. Rather than dealing effectively to secure the border, Federal officials have ceded 3500 acres to drug cartels and smugglers. Granted, that acreage is only three percent of the 118,000 acre park and no doubt a small area which no one will really miss viewing.  

This off-limits must also infer it’s OK for illegal aliens and criminals to tramp through a wildlife refuge, destroying the pristine environment with dead bodies, discarded clothes, empty food packages and bathroom tissue, because the government won’t enforce environmental laws, let alone border security.

However, if a U.S. citizen left trash behind, you can be sure government agents and prosecutors would work diligently to identify and charge that person or group with environment crimes. Prosecutors, I guess, aren’t afraid of U.S. citizens, but drug smugglers are seen as live-and-let live. Why?

Furthermore, this closure makes me wonder, how much more land will be placed off-limits to visitors? Ten thousand acres? A smuggling corridor up to Interstate 8? According to the refuge website, officials suggested that visitors plan their outdoor activities north of I-8. How much sovernity will the U.S. cede until it does something? Maybe they can negotiate an accommodation with drug cartels, although I often wonder how do you negotiate with murders.

What ultimately is annoying is that as a U.S. Citizen, I am kept from going where I please on land that isn’t marked with red, white and blue Property of the U.S. Government shields or posted against trespassing. All of which illustrates the saying, when the government can’t control the criminal, they control the law-abiding.

I have personal experience regarding that, and it illustrates how long this problem has existed. In 1993, I, my wife and 3-year old daughter traveled down by Douglas, Arizona. One of the area attractions was the John Slaughter Ranch, 15 miles east of town, about a mile or two from the border. The ranch has been restored as a historical site.

After touring it, I asked the guide, if the dirt road led down to the border. I wanted to drive to it and do touristy things. Like step across and enter Mexico “illegally”. Or stand with one foot in the U.S. and one in Mexico. If there was border marker, take a photo standing next to it. Also, I would have stood there and pondered what it would be like to have lived in this area in Slaughter’s day . 

Upon my query, the guide told me that the DEA said the area was off-limits because of drug smuggling and you couldn’t go without prior permission. I thought then, as I do now, that a bunch of narco criminals were defining where I could or could not travel.

As a practical matter, we were traveling armed, so we would not have been easily victimized. But with my daughter, I thought better of it and we didn’t travel to the border.

Today, that would be different. My daughter is a little bigger now and we would  again exercise our 2A right. In our border jaunt, it would be the height of irony, if we were stopped by Federal law enforcement and asked what were we doing there. To which I would reply, we were just sight seeing. No doubt, we would be asked to show our “papers”. Isn’t that the law that the President thinks is wrong? Sorry, my mistake; it’s the Arizona law he opposes.

Ultimately, if Federal border officials viewed a vehicle crossing the Mexican border northbound, I wonder if they would stop it to check “papers”, although that could be construed as profiling. Or would that illegal entry be in an area negotiated off limits to U.S. Citizens? Does anyone in Homeland Security realize that when the enemy restricts your movement in your sovereign territory, they’re winning?

Things, I suspect, will only get uglier.

Drug-Fueled Civil War: 55 Bodies Found In Mexican Mine Over 22,700 have lost their lives in drug-related violence in the past three years

Drug-Fueled Civil War: 55 Bodies Found In Mexican Mine

June 7th, 2010 Posted By Pat Dollard.

baqeri_d20100607210709780

Press TV:

Mexican prosecutors say they have recovered 55 bodies from an airshaft of a mine in southern Mexico amid conflicts between drug traffickers.

This appears to be the largest mass grave ever found in the country. The bodies were found in the state of Guerrero, which is one of the most violence-stricken states of Mexico.

“By Saturday night, the total number of bodies recovered from that airshaft was 55, so terminating the work,” Albertico Guinto Sierra, a local official, said on Monday.

The victims were found 100 meters down the airshaft, which is located near the entrance to a mine.

Mexico has endured a staggering level of drug-related violence during over the past few years.

The situation has become worse since the Mexican military crackdown on organized crime.

Over 22,700 have lost their lives in drug-related violence in the past three years.

Tea Party Patriots is Standing with Arizona

Tea Party Patriots is Standing with Arizona

Join Tea Party Patriots Now
and
Stand with Arizona!

When: Saturday May 29th, 2010 6:00pm – 9:00pm
Where: Diablo Stadium, Tempe, Arizona
2200 West Alameda Tempe, AZ 85252
Come one come all! This event will allow you to stand and be counted among the supporters of Arizona’s fight at the border. Speakers will educate and performers will entertain in this family friendly venue. Spend your Memorial Day weekend in Arizona! Caravans of people from across the USA are encouraged to come and support Arizona tourism. 

Featuring


“America’s Toughest Sheriff”
Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio

Also featuring:
Master of Ceremonies: Mike Broomhead of KFYI Radio
Dr. Gina Loudon, founder and leader of the BUYcott campaign.
Marc Spencer, President, Phoenix Law Enforcement Association.
…with many other great speakers in the lineup.
 

64% of Americans stand in favor of Arizona’s immigration enforcement law – NBC News/Wall Street Journal Poll

71 % of Arizonans stand in favor of Arizona’s immigration enforcement law – Rasmussen.

President Obama stands against Arizona for it’s new law, though he admits he hasn’t even read it.

President Calderon of Mexico stands against Arizona’s new law, and the Democrats in the House of Representatives give him a standing ovation.

Cities including San Francisco, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Boulder, Boston, St. Paul, Austin, El Paso, Oakland and San Diego stand against Arizona.

All of this, and yet Arizona citizens are standing strong.
We stand with the citizens of Arizona.
Do you stand with us?

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 56 other followers