McCain and Obama on Immigration

While John McCain is running as far as he can to the right, pretending to be tough on border security now that it is an election year, his closest friends and campaign workers are saying the opposite. Grant Woods, a McCain campaign “senior advisor” and known liberal Republican in Arizona, recently told the Washington Post in an interview, “To be an Arizonan is to be a part of Mexico.” Does this mean Mr. Woods believes the U.S. should cede parts of the country to Mexico to form Aztlan? These kinds of views should come as no surprise from McCain’s campaign staff. His 2008 presidential campaign staff included Juan Hernandez, one of the biggest open borders proponents in the nation.

McCain may fool a few people during this election year who watch his misleading commercials on Fox News. But he has 24 years in the Senate he can’t hide. Watch this 2-minute video below which contrasts Obama’s statements on immigration with Obama’s. They’re exactly the same! In fact, in January of this year, Obama’s press spokesperson Robert Gibbs praised McCain for having the same view on immigration as Obama, and said that the administration wanted him to help them resolve the issue. Even the opposition knows McCain hasn’t changed on immigration.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mJGc1_flZ8

McCain’s Last Stand?: “Maverick” In Fierce Fight To Hold Onto Senate Seat

McCain’s Last Stand?: “Maverick” In Fierce Fight To Hold Onto Senate Seat

June 6th, 2010 Posted By Pat Dollard.

McCain's Last Stand

LAKE HAVASU CITY, Ariz. (AP) – A serious re-election fight wasn’t what Republican John McCain expected when he returned to the Senate after losing the presidency.

But the four-term senator is battling for his political life in a race that embodies the volatility of an unpredictable election year. He’s facing former Rep. J.D. Hayworth, a fellow Republican pushing him farther to the right as GOP voters demand conservative purity in their candidates and punish those with ties to the Washington establishment.

Two longtime Senate incumbents have fallen—Bob Bennett, R-Utah, and Arlen Specter, D-Pa. A third—Blanche Lincoln, D-Ark.—could see her hopes dashed this Tuesday in a runoff amid voter inclination to reward political neophytes who adhere to party principles over experience.

McCain’s popularity fell in Arizona as he spent years campaigning outside of it, twice for the White House. Hayworth, a radio talk show host who had been in Congress for a dozen years but lost to a Democrat in 2006, saw a chance for a political comeback.

The behemoth in the race, McCain has a decades-old political organization, millions in the bank and six campaign offices. He’s counting on his deep ties to Arizona and legions of longtime backers to carry him through. In contrast, Hayworth has never run statewide, is struggling to raise money and has just two offices. But he’s being fueled by disaffected McCain backers and voters hungry for new leadership.

“He’s been there too long. And he hasn’t done anything for Arizona,” Ally Miller says of McCain, 73. “It’s time for someone new.”

Among Hayworth supporters, there’s a feeling that McCain hasn’t been a loyal Republican, he’s ignored Arizona and his time has passed. Many have voted for him for years—because, they say, there wasn’t another option. With the 51-year-old Hayworth, people fed up with the status quo—and unwilling to automatically give McCain a new six-year term—have somewhere to turn.

“Hayworth is a true conservative patriot,” said a supporter, John Kessler. “McCain has become a big government, tax-and-spend liberal.”

Conservatives: Beware of McCain Regression Syndrome

Conservatives: Beware of McCain Regression Syndrome

By Michelle Malkin  •  January 22, 2010 09:10 AM

The question isn’t why Sarah Palin is helping John McCain. The question is: What are you doing to stop him from cementing his Big Government Republican legacy?

***

Conservatives: Beware of McCain Regression Syndrome
by Michelle Malkin
Creators Syndicate
Copyright 2010

Pay attention: In the afterglow of the Massachusetts Miracle, there are flickers of peril for The Right. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but like Paul Revere’s midnight-message, consider this warning “a cry of defiance, and not of fear.” Conservatives have worked hard over the past year to rebuild after Big Government Republican John McCain’s defeat. But McCain isn’t going gently into that good night.

Red Flag Number One: A reader from Arizona informed me the day after the Bay State Bombshell that he had received a robo-call from Massachusetts GOP Sen.-elect Scott Brown. “He basically wanted me to vote for John McCain in November,” the reader said in his description of the automated campaign call supporting the four-term Sen. McCain’s re-election bid. “No wonder [Brown] said he hadn’t had any sleep…he was busy recording phone messages!”

Red Flag Number Two: Also in the wake of the Massachusetts special election, the nation’s most popular conservative political figure, Sarah Palin, announced she would be campaigning for her former running mate in Arizona in March. Palin told Facebook followers that she’s going to “ride the tide with commonsense candidates” and help “heroes and statesmen” like McCain. Facing mounting conservative opposition in his home state and polls showing him virtually tied with possible GOP challenger and former Rep. J.D. Hayworth, McCain welcomed the boost: “Sarah energized our nation and remains a leading voice in the Republican Party.”

Savor the irony: After a career spent bashing the right flank of the party, Sen. McCain is now clinging to its coattails to save his incumbent hide.

And pay attention to the hidden, more troubling irony: While he runs to the right to protect his seat, McCain’s political machine is working across the country to install liberal and establishment Republicans to secure his legacy.

In Florida, McCain’s Country First Political Action Committee is supporting the Senate bid of fellow illegal alien amnesty supporter and global warming alarmist, GOP Gov. Charlie Crist, whose crucial 2008 primary endorsement rescued McCain from disaster. Grass-roots conservatives support former GOP statehouse leader Marco Rubio – who is hitting Crist hard for lying to voters about his embrace of President Obama’s pork-laden, fraud-ridden stimulus package.

In Colorado, McCain and his meddlers infuriated the state party by anointing former lieutenant governor Jane Norton to challenge endangered Democrat Sen. Michael Bennet. She’s a milquetoast public official who has served on a lot of task forces and GOP clubs – and who happens to be the sister-in-law of big Beltway insider Charlie Black. An estimated 40 percent of her coffers are filled with out-of-state money (and much of that is flowing from the Beltway).

The mini-McCain of Colorado claims to oppose “special interests,” but has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars from D.C. lobbyists at McCain’s behest – stifling the candidacy of strong conservative rivals led by grass-roots-supported Weld County District Attorney Ken Buck, an amnesty opponent whose aggressive illegal immigration prosecutions have earned him the rage of the far Left and big business Right. A recent Rasmussen poll showed Buck and another GOP candidate Tom Wiens beating Bennet – despite the huge cash and crony advantage of front-runner and blank-slate Jane.

In California, McCain’s PAC supports former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina – a celebrity name with deep pockets of her own, massive media exposure, and a checkered business record. Fiorina served as the economic adviser to McCain, who supported the $700 billion TARP bailout, the $25 billion auto bailout, a $300 billion mortgage bailout, and the first $85 billion AIG bailout. As GOP rival and grass-roots-supported Chuck DeVore’s camp notes, Fiorina has also vacillated publicly over the Obama stimulus. With taxpayer “friends” like this, who needs Democrats?

With all due respect to McCain’s past noble war service, it’s time to head to the pasture. As the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday, he was wrong on the constitutionality of the free-speech-stifling McCain-Feingold campaign finance regulations. He was wrong to side with the junk-science global warming activists in pushing onerous carbon caps on America. He was on the wrong side of every Chicken Little-driven bailout. He was wrong in opposing enhanced CIA interrogation methods that have saved countless American lives and averted jihadi plots. And he was spectacularly wrong in teaming with the open-borders lobby to push a dangerous illegal alien amnesty.

Tea Party activists are rightly outraged by Sarah Palin’s decision to campaign for McCain, whose entrenched incumbency and progressive views are anathema to the movement. At least she has an excuse: She’s caught between a loyalty rock and a partisan hard place. The conservative base has no such obligations – and it is imperative that they get in the game (as they did in Massachusetts) before it’s too late. The movement to restore limited government in Washington has come too far, against all odds, to succumb to McCain Regression Syndrome now.

McCain border security plan falls short in Senate

McCain border security plan falls short in Senate

See Mccain add for earmarking funds for troops

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2hz5CZh1_M

McCain troop plan falls short in Senate

The Senate turned back an effort Thursday by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) to put 6,000 more security troops on the U.S.-Mexico border, as Democrats instead suggested that President Obama’s proposal for the temporary addition of a 1,200-person force was sufficient for now.

The McCain measure was proposed as an amendment to a $59 billion spending bill that funds the troop surge in Afghanistan and other emergency measures. It required 60 votes under Senate rules but fell short with 51. Forty-six senators voted no.

The border security battle has become the most politically contentious issue surrounding what has otherwise become a routine passage of the supplemental war-spending bill. Sensing the shifting ground, Obama proposed Tuesday a plan that would increase funding by $500 million and temporarily send 1,200 National Guard troops to help shore up the Border Patrol’s efforts against illegal immigration and Mexican drug cartels.

But Republicans rejected Obama’s effort as insufficient to deal with something they consider a national crisis.

“While it’s important to have additional resources there, even on a temporary basis, even on a limited basis, there’s a whole lot more that we need to do. We need permanent solutions, not temporary solutions,” Sen. John Cornyn (Tex.), a member of the Republican leadership and a co-sponsor of McCain’s amendment, told reporters Wednesday.

Most Democrats rejected the GOP plan as unnecessary, given the presidential proposal. “It’s sort of throwing an enormous amount of money at the problem that is not as carefully thought out, not as targeted and as effective, quite frankly, as President Obama’s plan,” Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said moments before the vote.

Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), the chamber’s lone Latino member, criticized the McCain plan as “militarizing the border.” “It’s a recipe for failure,” Menendez said, arguing instead for a comprehensive immigration reform plan backed by Obama.

McCain more interested in attacking JD Hayworth than he was Obama. If McCain had gone after Obama the way he is going after JD, he’d probably be president right now

McCain attacking JD Hayworth much more than he attacked ObamaPosted by Guest Opinion under Campaigns & Elections
[33] Comments 

Thursday, May 6, 2010

McCain more interested in attacking JD Hayworth than he was Obama. If McCain had gone after Obama the way he is going after JD, he’d probably be president right now

McCain, who labels himself in recent television ads as “the last line of defense” against Obama, is attacking JD Hayworth harder than he ever attacked Obama. Although polling in 2008 revealed that attacking Obama’s America-hating Pastor Reverend Wright would have aided his failing campaign, McCain refused to. From a Politico article: “Wright is off the table,” said one top campaign official. “It’s all McCain. He won’t go there. His advisers would have gone there.” Among those who think Wright is fair game is McCain’s running mate, Palin, who told conservative commentator William Kristol for a New York Times column last month: “To tell you the truth, Bill, I don’t know why that association isn’t discussed more, because those were appalling things that that pastor had said about our great country, and to have sat in the pews for 20 years and listened to that – with, I don’t know, a sense of condoning it, I guess, because he didn’t get up and leave – to me, that does say something about character. But, you know, I guess that would be a John McCain call on whether he wants to bring that up.”
Wright should have been fair game. His anti-American statements needed to be denounced. Even OBAMA denounced them! In his famous speech on race, delivered in Philadelphia in March, Obama condemned Wright’s use of “incendiary language to express views that have the potential not only to widen the racial divide, but views that denigrate both the greatness and the goodness of our nation; that rightly offend white and black alike.”
Now, the McCain campaign is going full throttle attacking JD Hayworth on baseless claims. They’ve attacked him for being a birther — he’s not. They’ve attacked statements he’s made on gay marriage — at least JD is consistent; McCain flip-flops on gay marriage. They’ve attacked him for receiving $2250 from Abramoff, which JD donated to charity after it was determined Abramoff was corrupt – yet McCain’s prominent endorser Grover Norquist served as an actual conduit for Abramoff funds.
Memo to John McCain: if you’d put as much effort into attacking Democrat Obama as you are fellow Republican Hayworth, maybe you would be president now

New Rasmussen Poll Shows J.D. Hayworth Gaining On John McCain : 47% vs 42% Spread Of Only 5%!

New Rasmussen Poll Shows J.D. Hayworth Gaining On John McCain : 47% vs 42% Spread Of Only 5%!Posted on April 30, 2010 by Political Ape

new Rasmussen poll shows J.D. Hayworth gaining on John McCain:

Incumbent John McCain now earns just 47% support to challenger J.D. Hayworth’s 42% in Arizona’s hotly contested Republican Senate Primary race, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of likely primary voters.

McCain has been losing ground since January when he picked up 53% of the potential GOP Primary vote and Hayworth had only 31% support. Last month, the longtime senator and 2008 GOP presidential candidate earned 48% of the vote, while 41% of likely primary voters supported his challenger.

Arizona: Doing the job the feds won’t do

Michelle Malkin 

Arizona: Doing the job the feds won’t do

By Michelle Malkin  •  April 23, 2010 05:06 PM


Open-borders lobby in a frenzy

It’s official: GOP Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer has signed the nation’s toughest immigration enforcement bill. They’re doing the job the feds won’t do — taking the law and our borders seriously to protect the health, safety, and welfare of our citizens first.

Cue the ACLU lawyers, the open-borders lobby, and the race-card players. And watch the Left show you what intolerance is really all about.

For his part, Cardinal Roger Mahony is at it again — likening pro-enforcement advocates to Nazis.

My previous blogging on Mahoney’s open-borders zealotry is here.

And no surprise: Obama’s DOJ is ready to pounce.

We don’t need election season converts like John McCain leading the opposition to the Democrats’ shamnesty response. We need trustworthy conservative stalwarts who can withstand the relentless smear campaign against supporters of strict, consistent, effective immigration and entrance enforcement.