White House pays Google to push Obamacare

 

White House pays Google to push Obamacare

 


Posted: August 22, 2011
2:21 pm Eastern

© 2011

In the “Why are we not surprised?” department, Surfin’ Safari has learned
that the government watchdog group Judicial
Watch
can prove the Obama administration used our taxpayer dollars to
orchestrate a campaign to manipulate search engines to promote Obamacare.

Under a Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA, lawsuit, Judicial Watch learned
through Department of Health and Human Services documents that the Obama White
House “helped coordinate a multimillion dollar taxpayer-funded campaign to use
Internet search engines such as Google and Yahoo to drive web traffic to a
government website promoting the Affordable Health Care Act (also known as
Obamacare).”

According to Judicial Watch, the campaign, which included PR firm The Ogilvy
Group, was designed “to increase public support for the president’s health-care
overhaul among key Obama campaign demographics, specifically Hispanics, blacks
and women.”

“The 2,328 pages of records, obtained by Judicial Watch pursuant to a March
23, 2011, FOIA lawsuit (Judicial
Watch v. Department of Health and Human Services
(No. 11-608)), include
internal correspondence between officials at the HHS office of the Assistant
Secretary for Public Affairs, as well as communications with representatives
from The Ogilvy Group, the public relations firm hired by the Obama
administration to manage the Obamacare campaign,” Judicial Watch reports.

Follow
this link
to read how Obama and company did it.

Read more:
White
House pays Google to push Obamacare
http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=336697#ixzz1VsRFzcXn

Death Panels are Not ObamaCare’s Only Killer Provisions

Death Panels are Not ObamaCare’s Only Killer Provisions

January 7th, 2011

Steven Ertelt, LifeNews.com

Never mind the controversy over the so-called death panels in the controversial ObamaCare health care law. One pro-life group says the measure should be repealed because it contains rationing elsewhere.

Although the death panels — the voluntary advanced care planning that pro-life advocates have been concerned about because it could have doctors financially motivated to promote less medical care and lifesaving treatment — have occupied most of the debate, the National Right to Life Committee says other provisions cause concern.

In a new letter to House members that LifeNews.com obtained, NRLC urges a yes vote on the repeal measure the House of representatives is slated to consider next week.

The abortion funding ObamaCare doesn’t satisfactorily prohibit is a central tenet of the pro-repeal letter.

“As enacted, the PPACA contains multiple provisions authorizing federal subsidies for abortion, and additional provisions on which future abortion-expanding regulatory mandates may be based,” the pro-life group tells lawmakers.

But the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” also contains “multiple provisions that will, if fully implemented, result in government-imposed rationing of lifesaving medical care,’ NRLC says:

The department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will be empowered to impose so-called “quality and efficiency” measures on health care providers, based on recommendations by the Independent Payment Advisory Board, which is directed to force private health care spending below the rate of medical inflation. In many cases treatment that a doctor and patient deem needed or advisable to save that patient’s life or preserve or improve the patient’s health but which runs afoul of the imposed standards will be denied, even if the patient wants to pay for it.

The law empowers HHS to prevent older Americans from making up with their own funds for the $555 billion the law cuts from Medicare by refusing to permit senior citizens the choice of private-fee-for-service plans….

Read more.

Form the blog author I’m Back From a nightmare Please Read

You may not even noticed I was not blogging from July 7 to Aug 18. I had sudden infection of the Gall Bladder. Boy did that hurt. I was in the hospital for 8 days part of it on the critical list. The infection affected other organs. After 8 days in bed very ill (critical list several days I lost all of my muscle tone. They wanted to remove the gall baldder but I am over weight, have Atrial fibrlation, sleep Apnea, I have bad knees so I walk with a walker, I am 76 years old and Asthma so surgery was too riscky,at that point drain was put into the gall bladder to keep everything under control, they put in a Chatheter for urine control They sent me to a Rehab center for 5 Weeks. My infection was cured and my other organs bounced back. I went to grueling Physical therapy and occupaional therapy every day. I’m still not back to my old self yet (a long grind). The surgeon decided to just remove the drain since I had no previous gall bladder problems.

The main reason I’m writing is a warning for overweght people. I am Morbidly Obese I weighed 350 pounds when I entered the Hospital I lost 35 pounds during the process. My Obesity put my life at risk and greatly complicated the rehab. Had I been at a reasonable weight none of this would have been no problem. This frightenend me enough that I’m getting back to the ATKINS Diet ( I lost fom 400 t0 300  a couple of years ago on this ) I know that being Obesity is a fatal disease. I would encourage any of you that are overweight to re-evalute the risk. I almost died from stupidity. I spent 8 days in the hospital in excruciating pain and the rest of the time in continual pain from intense therapy and dealing with catheter problems. I was fortunate to have exceptional Doctors. The rehab center run By Volunteer Of America was outstanding I’m sill weak and will undergo more in home therapy I used up a great deal of my heath benefits and had to pay $125 per day for the last part of my care.

Dont gamble like I did It almost most cost me my life and used up  a lot of my madicare benefits.  If Obama has his way I might have been denied any care at all

Bud

Obamacare will increase USA’s tab

Report: Obamacare will increase USA’s tab

April 24th, 2010

USA Today

President Obama’s health care overhaul law will increase the nation’s health care tab instead of bringing costs down, government economic forecasters concluded Thursday in a sobering assessment of the sweeping legislation.
A report by economic experts at the Health and Human Services Department said the health care remake will achieve Obama’s aim of expanding health insurance — adding 34 million Americans to the coverage rolls.

But the analysis also found that the law falls short of the president’s twin goal of controlling runaway costs. It also warned that Medicare cuts may be unrealistic and unsustainable, driving about 15% of hospitals into the red and “possibly jeopardizing access” to care for seniors.

The mixed verdict for Obama’s signature issue is the first comprehensive look by neutral experts.

In particular, the warnings about Medicare could become a major political liability for Democratic lawmakers in the midterm elections. Seniors are more likely to vote than younger people and polls show they are already deeply skeptical of the law.

The report from Medicare’s Office of the Actuary carried a disclaimer saying it does not represent the official position of the Obama administration. White House officials have repeatedly complained that such analyses have been too pessimistic and lowball the law’s potential to achieve savings.

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JCT: Healthcare law to sock middle class with a $3.9 billion tax increase in 2019

JCT: Healthcare law to sock middle class with a $3.9 billion tax increase in 2019

April 14th, 2010

By Jay Heflin, The Hill

 There goes that campaign pledge

Taxpayers earning less than $200,000 a year will pay roughly $3.9 billion more in taxes — in 2019 alone — due to healthcare reform, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation, Congress’s official scorekeeper.

The new law raises $15.2 billion over 10 years by limiting the medical expense deduction, a provision widely used by taxpayers who either have a serious illness or are older.

Taxpayers can currently deduct medical expenses in excess of 7.5 percent of their adjusted gross income. Starting in 2013, most taxpayers will only be able to deduct expenses greater than 10 percent of AGI. Older taxpayers are hit by this threshold increase in 2017.

Once the law is fully implemented in 2019, the JCT estimates the deduction limitation will affect 14.8 million taxpayers — 14.7 million of them will earn less than $200,000 a year. These taxpayers are single and joint filers, as well as heads of households.

“Loss of this deduction will mean higher taxes for 14.7 million individuals and families making under $200,000 a year in 2019,” Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) told The Hill. “The new subsidy for health insurance would not be available to offset this tax increase for most of these households.”

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Healthcare aftershocks

Healthcare aftershocks

Politics | Returning to D.C., Democrats prepare to capitalize on the passage of Obamacare | Emily Belz

WASHINGTON—Members of Congress returning in mid-April from Easter recess face a traffic jam of legislation awaiting passage—and pressure from the White House to pass it. Democrats want to turn the momentum they feel from the passage of healthcare reform into more legislative successes before the end of the year. Passing certain measures could help Democrats in the November elections, too.

Campaign finance

During President Obama’s January State of the Union address, he delivered a stern condemnation of a Supreme Court decision on campaign finance and urged Congress to pass legislation to counter the decision. The court’s Citizens United decision allows corporations to spend money in favor of candidates or political issues—but corporations are still forbidden from directly contributing to a campaign. A majority of Americans, according to various polls, opposed at least the principle of an expanded role of corporations in elections. Democrats undoubtedly see political opportunity in passing campaign finance laws to counter the court’s decision.

Financial reform

Almost two years have passed since the financial crisis hit full force, and the Senate has just finished sweating out a financial regulation bill, which initially had input from one Republican, Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee. The lead Democrat on the issue, Sen. Chris Dodd of Connecticut, bypassed Corker in final negotiations over the bill as it became clear that Senate Republicans would oppose the bill. Corker called the Republican strategy an “error” because he believes the measure will become law and find popular support. Wall Street is an easy target in a hurting economy and an election year. The Senate could vote on the measure in coming weeks, and since the House has already passed its own version, the country could see new financial regulations by the summer.

Immigration

A bevy of groups have held rallies in Washington calling for immigration reform—something President Bush attempted without success—but the issue probably won’t appear on the top of the congressional agenda this year. An election year is no time to be passing something as controversial and with so little political payback as immigration reform. President Obama said recently that his commitment to passing comprehensive immigration reform is “unwavering.” 

Cap-and-trade

News articles have marked the death of climate change legislation—”cap-and-trade”—numerous times, but it’s one issue that doesn’t appear to be going away. The cap-and-trade tool itself, in which companies would pay a tax on their emissions, is defunct in Congress, but other measures to address emissions and energy are still alive and kicking. All eyes are on the Senate, since the House passed a cap-and-trade bill last summer. Forty-four Democrats voted against the House bill, so if Congress has any chance of passing a final bill into law, it would have to be substantially different and the vote will need to happen before November elections, when Democrats could lose a number of seats.

Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., Joe Lieberman, I-Conn., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., have been scheming up their own bill, which they plan to release in coming weeks. Their collaboration, dubbed “KLG,” is perhaps the measure that has the most possibility of passing at this point. Sens. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, have also introduced a bill regulating emissions that could gain bipartisan support in the Senate.

The unspoken worry is that if Congress does nothing to address climate change, the administration will take action on its own, giving the Environmental Protection Agency a long leash to impose regulations. By next year the EPA will begin requiring the country’s largest emitters to buy permits for their greenhouse gases. The KLG bill would replace the EPA’s regulating authority on that issue. President Obama has lately also announced plans to expand nuclear energy and offshore drilling. 

Nancy and Harry want you to choose the best candy bar

Nancy and Harry want you to choose the best candy bar

Peter Wilson

A sample of the level of detail in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka ObamaCare):

SEC. 4205
H) RESTAURANTS, RETAIL FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS, AND VENDING MACHINES
(viii) VENDING MACHINES.-
(I) IN GENERAL.-In the case of an article of food sold from a vending machine that-
(aa) does not permit a prospective purchaser to examine the Nutrition Facts Panel before purchasing the article or does not otherwise provide visible nutrition in formation at the point of purchase; and
(bb) is operated by a person who is engaged in the business of owning or operating 20 or more vending machines, the vending machine operator shall provide a sign in close proximity to each article of food or the selection button that includes a clear and conspicuous statement disclosing the number of calories contained in the article.
Soon we will be able to make an informed choice between Snickers, M&Ms and Doritos.   Truly history-making. 
My only contact with vending machines is at rest areas, when I need a caffeine and sugar infusion to keep me in my lane.  I already know I shouldn’t buy the stuff, but I figure one Coke won’t kill me.  A little calorie sticker isn’t going to change my destructive habits.  I’m sure this is aimed at vending machines in schools, with some connection to the Childhood Obesity Demonstration Project (which by the way received $25 million for each budget year from 2010 to 2014).
Okay, so putting up a sign with the calories in a candy bar isn’t the end of western civilization.  But it’s a bit creepy that grown men and women sit around thinking this is so important that the federal government needs to get involved.