Pelosi, Obama Hawaiian vacations end, but taxpayers left with the bill

Pelosi, Obama Hawaiian vacations end, but taxpayers left with the bill

Posted By admin On January 3, 2011 @ 9:53 pm In News | No Comments

BY MALIA ZIMMERMANNancy Pelosi’s final days as Speaker of the House were spent at the exotic Four Seasons Resort Hualalai at Historic Ka’upulehu in Kona on the island of Hawaii.

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Who is more unpopular than Obama?

Who is more unpopular than Obama?

Rick
Moran

 

As always, Gallup
has the answer:

Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s favorable rating is down
seven percentage points since May to 29%, a new low for her since assuming the
top congressional post.

Pelosi’s ratings were 2-to-1 positive, 44% to
22%, when she first assumed the speakership in January 2007, but they became
closely divided by March of that year and remained so in November 2008. Views
became more negative than positive for the first time in the first half of 2009,
possibly because of Pelosi’s public stance against the CIA’s use of “enhanced
interrogation” of terrorist suspects at Guantanamo Bay prison, and her dispute
with the CIA over whether she had been briefed on the matter. Spanning the
period these issues were in the news, her favorable rating fell from 42% to 32%.
Pelosi’s favorable rating recovered slightly in the first half of 2010 to 36%,
but it has since tumbled to the new low.
Independents in particular have become more negative about Pelosi, with her
favorability dwindling nine points among this group since May, to 21%. Nearly 6
in 10 independents (58%) now view her unfavorably, compared with 86% of
Republicans and 22% of Democrats.

With her own members running re-election ads trashing her, those numbers
aren’t surprising. There is little doubt that she will have a much easier time
managing things next January when her decimated caucus looks up from the
minority benches.

Nancy Pelosi calls for investigation into opponents of Ground Zero Mosque

Nancy Pelosi calls for investigation into opponents of Ground Zero Mosque

Thomas Lifson

The most powerful woman in government “join[s] those who have called for looking into how is this opposition to the mosque being funded.” KCBS radio in San Francisco interviewed the Speaker. Listen here.

Pelosi made a fool of herself calling the tea parties “Astroturf,” and this remark is, if anything, even stupider. On Planet Pelosi, the only way a political movement happens is with funding and direction from above — as in the case of the vast network of Soros-funded organizations, and the Axelrod-sponsored Astroturf groups. The concept that ordinary people stand up and protest because of their convictions is alien to her.
So much for her respect for the will of the people. They are but sheep on Planet Peloisi, objects to be manipulated.
Hat tip: iOwnTheWorld

Ed Lasky adds:

The Speaker of the House has no respect for the Constitutional right to free speech; all partisan politics all the time. Third in line to the Presidency.  Isn’t the House dedicated to open debate; aren’t members supposed to respect the principle of free speech and the value of open debate? I guess that is only true when those speaking agree with the speaker and are liberal Democrats. Is Pelosi paranoid? And why did we have to wait for ObamaCare to pass before we found out what was in it? How about that agenda-to hide provisions so as not to allow people to debate its provisions? How about Pelosi’s views towards town halls?

Pelosi: It’s Cheaper to Treat Teens for Drug Use Than Interdict Drugs at Border

Pelosi: It’s Cheaper to Treat Teens for Drug Use Than Interdict Drugs at Border
Thursday, May 06, 2010
By Edwin Mora


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
(CNSNews.com) – While pointing out that it is the responsibility of the federal government to secure the U.S.-Mexico border, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D.-Calif.) said Thursday it is cheaper to treat teens for drug use than it is to interdict drugs being smuggled across the border.
 
CNSNews.com pointed out to the speaker at her weekly press briefing that a recent Justice Department report indicated that one in five U.S. teenagers used drugs last year, and then asked: “Are you committed to sealing the border against the influx of illegal drugs from Mexico and, if so, do you have a target date in mind for getting that done?”
 
“Well if your question is about drugs, I’m for reducing demand in the United States,” said Pelosi. “That is what our responsibility is on this subject. The RAND Corporation a few years ago did a report that said it would be much less expensive for us to, through prevention first and foremost, but through treatment on demand to reduce demand in our country, is the cheapest way to solve this problem.
 
“Incarceration is the next cheapest,” Pelosi continued. “It costs seven times more to incarcerate than to have treatment on demand. It costs 15 times more to interdict at the border. And it costs 25 times more with eradication of the cocoa leaf. This is an issue that it is very important to our country because of what it’s doing to our teenagers. That is the problem, what it is doing to our people.”
video below

http://www.eyeblast.tv/public/checker.aspx?v=Xd6UkU4znz

The RAND Corporation is a non-partisan, non-profit institution aimed at helping to “improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis.”

According to the Justice Department’s National Drug Threat Assessment for 2010, “Nineteen percent of youth aged 12 to 17 report past year illicit drug use.” The assessment said that Mexican drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) are now the predominant supplier of illegal drugs in the United States. “Law enforcement reporting and case initiation data show that Mexican DTOs control most of the wholesale cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine distribution in the United States, as well as much of the marijuana distribution,” said the assessment.

Pelosi did say it was the responsibility of the federal government to control the border, although she did not believe that would prevent illicit drug use by teens in the United States.

“Controlling our border is our responsibility,” she said. “So, whether you’re talking about stopping drugs from coming in or having a well-managed migration policy, we have a responsibility to secure our border. But I don’t know what you meant by ‘seal’ and I think sealing the border doesn’t do a whole lot to reduce demand in the United States. As I travel the country, I know that kids are on meth and they can make it in their bath tub.”
 
To solve the drug problem, she said, requires reducing demand. “Let’s secure our border for every reason that we have responsibility to do so,” she said, “but if it’s talk, if our purpose is to solve that problem, we must reduce demand and the best way to do that is through prevention and through treatment on demand.”

Last week, CNSNews.com similarly asked Rep. Raul Grijalva (D.-Ariz.), who represents a district that covers 300 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, if he was committed to sealing the border against the inflow of illegal drugs. Rather than answer the question, Grijalva turned and walked away, eventually shouting back at the reporter that it was “punkish” to ask the question.
 
Transcript of Speaker Pelosi’s answer to CNSNews.com’s question on stopping illicit drug traffic across U.S.-Mexico border:
 
CNSNews.com: Madame Speaker, the Justice Department has reported that one in five teenagers used illicit drugs last year and that most of those drugs came across the border from Mexico. Are you committed to sealing the border against the influx of illegal drugs from Mexico and, if so, do you have a target date in mind for getting that done?
 
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.): “Well if your question is about drugs, I’m for reducing demand in the United States. That is what our responsibility is on this subject. The RAND Corporation a few years ago did a report that said it would be much less expensive for us to, through prevention first and foremost, but through treatment on demand to reduce demand in our country, is the cheapest way to solve this problem.

“Incarceration is the next cheapest. It costs seven times more to incarcerate than to have treatment on demand. It costs 15 times more to interdict at the border. And it costs 25 times more with eradication of the cocoa leaf. This is an issue that it is very important to our country because of what it’s doing to our teenagers. That is the problem, what it is doing to our people.
 
“Controlling our border is our responsibility. So, whether you’re talking about stopping drugs from coming in or having a well-managed migration policy, we have a responsibility to secure our border. But I don’t know what you meant by ‘seal’ and I think sealing the border doesn’t do a whole lot to reduce demand in the United States. As I travel the country, I know that kids are on meth and they can make it in their bath tub. So, again if the issue is predicated on your first premise, which is one in five teenagers in America has used drugs, is that the point?
 
CNSNews.com: “Yes.”
 
Pelosi: “Okay, so let’s, you know, let’s secure our border for every reason that we have responsibility to do so, but if it’s talk, if our purpose is to solve that problem, we must reduce demand and the best way to do that is through prevention and through treatment on demand.”

Healthcare aftershocks

Healthcare aftershocks

Politics | Returning to D.C., Democrats prepare to capitalize on the passage of Obamacare | Emily Belz

WASHINGTON—Members of Congress returning in mid-April from Easter recess face a traffic jam of legislation awaiting passage—and pressure from the White House to pass it. Democrats want to turn the momentum they feel from the passage of healthcare reform into more legislative successes before the end of the year. Passing certain measures could help Democrats in the November elections, too.

Campaign finance

During President Obama’s January State of the Union address, he delivered a stern condemnation of a Supreme Court decision on campaign finance and urged Congress to pass legislation to counter the decision. The court’s Citizens United decision allows corporations to spend money in favor of candidates or political issues—but corporations are still forbidden from directly contributing to a campaign. A majority of Americans, according to various polls, opposed at least the principle of an expanded role of corporations in elections. Democrats undoubtedly see political opportunity in passing campaign finance laws to counter the court’s decision.

Financial reform

Almost two years have passed since the financial crisis hit full force, and the Senate has just finished sweating out a financial regulation bill, which initially had input from one Republican, Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee. The lead Democrat on the issue, Sen. Chris Dodd of Connecticut, bypassed Corker in final negotiations over the bill as it became clear that Senate Republicans would oppose the bill. Corker called the Republican strategy an “error” because he believes the measure will become law and find popular support. Wall Street is an easy target in a hurting economy and an election year. The Senate could vote on the measure in coming weeks, and since the House has already passed its own version, the country could see new financial regulations by the summer.

Immigration

A bevy of groups have held rallies in Washington calling for immigration reform—something President Bush attempted without success—but the issue probably won’t appear on the top of the congressional agenda this year. An election year is no time to be passing something as controversial and with so little political payback as immigration reform. President Obama said recently that his commitment to passing comprehensive immigration reform is “unwavering.” 

Cap-and-trade

News articles have marked the death of climate change legislation—”cap-and-trade”—numerous times, but it’s one issue that doesn’t appear to be going away. The cap-and-trade tool itself, in which companies would pay a tax on their emissions, is defunct in Congress, but other measures to address emissions and energy are still alive and kicking. All eyes are on the Senate, since the House passed a cap-and-trade bill last summer. Forty-four Democrats voted against the House bill, so if Congress has any chance of passing a final bill into law, it would have to be substantially different and the vote will need to happen before November elections, when Democrats could lose a number of seats.

Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., Joe Lieberman, I-Conn., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., have been scheming up their own bill, which they plan to release in coming weeks. Their collaboration, dubbed “KLG,” is perhaps the measure that has the most possibility of passing at this point. Sens. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, have also introduced a bill regulating emissions that could gain bipartisan support in the Senate.

The unspoken worry is that if Congress does nothing to address climate change, the administration will take action on its own, giving the Environmental Protection Agency a long leash to impose regulations. By next year the EPA will begin requiring the country’s largest emitters to buy permits for their greenhouse gases. The KLG bill would replace the EPA’s regulating authority on that issue. President Obama has lately also announced plans to expand nuclear energy and offshore drilling. 

Nancy and Harry want you to choose the best candy bar

Nancy and Harry want you to choose the best candy bar

Peter Wilson

A sample of the level of detail in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka ObamaCare):

SEC. 4205
H) RESTAURANTS, RETAIL FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS, AND VENDING MACHINES
(viii) VENDING MACHINES.-
(I) IN GENERAL.-In the case of an article of food sold from a vending machine that-
(aa) does not permit a prospective purchaser to examine the Nutrition Facts Panel before purchasing the article or does not otherwise provide visible nutrition in formation at the point of purchase; and
(bb) is operated by a person who is engaged in the business of owning or operating 20 or more vending machines, the vending machine operator shall provide a sign in close proximity to each article of food or the selection button that includes a clear and conspicuous statement disclosing the number of calories contained in the article.
Soon we will be able to make an informed choice between Snickers, M&Ms and Doritos.   Truly history-making. 
My only contact with vending machines is at rest areas, when I need a caffeine and sugar infusion to keep me in my lane.  I already know I shouldn’t buy the stuff, but I figure one Coke won’t kill me.  A little calorie sticker isn’t going to change my destructive habits.  I’m sure this is aimed at vending machines in schools, with some connection to the Childhood Obesity Demonstration Project (which by the way received $25 million for each budget year from 2010 to 2014).
Okay, so putting up a sign with the calories in a candy bar isn’t the end of western civilization.  But it’s a bit creepy that grown men and women sit around thinking this is so important that the federal government needs to get involved.

March Of Infamy: Nobody Got Any Health Care Benefits And Everybody Lost Jobs

March Of Infamy: Nobody Got Any Health Care Benefits And Everybody Lost Jobs

March 31st, 2010 Posted By Pat Dollard.

pelosisaw

March 31 (Bloomberg) — Companies in the U.S. unexpectedly cut payrolls in March, according to data from a private report based on payrolls.

The 23,000 decline was the smallest in two years and followed a revised 24,000 drop the prior month, data from ADP Employer Services showed today. Over the previous six months, ADP’s initial figures have overstated the Labor Department’s first estimate of private payroll losses by as little as 2,000 in February to as much as 151,000 in November.

Companies are still hesitant to add workers until they see sustained sales gains and are convinced the economic recovery has taken hold. Economists surveyed by Bloomberg News anticipate the government’s report April 2 will show payrolls increased by 184,000, in part due to temporary hiring by the federal government to conduct the 2010 census and because of better weather compared with February.

“The labor market trend is still up,” said David Milleker, chief economist at Union Investment GmbH in Frankfurt, who was the only economist in a Bloomberg News survey to forecast the ADP figures would show a loss of jobs. “Today’s numbers might have disappointed relative to expectations but indicate not in the least a change in trend. It takes some more time for private sector job creation to return to normal.”

Weather Effects

A March payroll gain in line with the median estimate is “a reasonable kind of number” because ADP’s figures aren’t influenced by weather and don’t include government payrolls which will reflect hiring on temporary workers to conduct the census, Prakken said. ADP includes only private employment and doesn’t take into account hiring by government agencies.

Stock-index futures dropped after the report. The contract on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index fell 0.4 percent to 1,164.3 at 9:30 a.m. in New York.

“The economic recovery has not been long enough or strong enough along the way yet to produce the kind of rapid employment that people are hoping for,” Joel Prakken, chairman of Macroeconomic Advisers LLC in St. Louis, which produces the figures with ADP, said in a conference call with reporters after the report.

The ADP figures were forecast to show a gain of 40,000 jobs, according to the median estimate of 35 economists surveyed by Bloomberg. Projections ranged from a loss of 20,000 to a 100,000 gain.

March Rebound

Economists including Nigel Gault of IHS Global Insight in Lexington, Massachusetts, say severe winter storms in parts of the country last month likely depressed Labor Department payroll figures, while better weather in March will probably boost to this month’s numbers. Weather has less influence on the ADP report, economists say.

“Today’s figure does not incorporate a weather-related rebound that could be present in this month’s” report from the Labor Department, Prakken said in a statement. “It is reasonable to expect” that the government’s report will be “stronger” than the ADP estimate, he said.

The Labor Department’s report in two days is forecast to show the unemployment rate held at 9.7 percent in March for a third consecutive month, according to the Bloomberg survey median. The jobless rate has dropped since reaching a 26-year high of 10.1 percent in October.

The economy has lost 8.4 million jobs since the recession began in December 2007, the most of any downturn in the post- World War II era. In February, U.S. payrolls shrank by 36,000.

Goods Producers

Today’s ADP report showed a decrease of 51,000 workers in goods-producing industries including manufacturers and construction companies. Service providers added 28,000 workers.

Employment in construction fell by 43,000, while factories lost 9,000 jobs, ADP said.

Companies employing more than 499 workers shrank their workforces by 7,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses, with 50 to 499 employees, cut 4,000 jobs and small companies decreased payrolls by 12,000, ADP said.

Caterpillar Inc., the world’s largest maker of construction equipment, said last week that it plans to hire 500 workers this year to expand a generator plant in Newberry, South Carolina. “The expansion is likely to take three to four years and could vary based on demand and other factors,” Jim Dugan, a Caterpillar spokesman, said March 17 in an e-mail.

Other companies are still trimming payrolls. J.M. Smucker Co., the maker of jams, Folgers coffee and Jif peanut butter, said last week it is reducing the number of North American manufacturing facilities to 18 from 22. The cuts are estimated to result in a reduction of 700 full-time positions, or 15 percent of the Orrville, Ohio-based company’s workforce.

The ADP report is based on data from about 360,000 businesses with more than 22 million workers on payrolls. ADP began keeping records in January 2001 and started publishing its numbers in 2006.

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