Obama’s Love Affair with Chairman Mao: Part Deux

Obama’s Love Affair with Chairman Mao: Part Deux

Stella Paul

 

Remember when Obama celebrated his very first White House Christmas by
hanging Chairman
Mao
on his tree?  After all, nothing says, “I’m a traditional American,”
better than a shiny ball emblazoned with the face of a mass murdering Communist,
sparkling like an angel’s wings on Christmas
morning.
Alas, Obama’s paltry poll numbers forced him into all sorts of tiresome
charades, like decorating his Christmas tree without any Communists this year,
and ostentatiously shlepping around a book on Ronald Reagan.
But true love is hard to hide; it keeps blazing through in all the little
things.  Like publicly bowing to Mao’s successor,
Hu Jintao, with the trusting submission of a lovesick puppy.   Hey, it’s just a
nuclear summit… it’s not like Obama needed to look strong or
anything!
And then there are this week’s adoring little signals: delighting in
pianist Lang Lang’s musical performance at the White House of a famous Chinese
ballad.  It turns out the song, “My Motherland,” is a glorious celebration of
the slaughter of American “jackals” (otherwise known as drafted American
soldiers in the Korean war).  The ChiCom tyrants loved it, and the whole world
got to laugh at us pathetic suckers. Obama
was in heaven!
Now think back to junior high school, when all your friends figured out
your latest crush, because you couldn’t stop talking about him.  Well, check out
Obama’s State of the Union!  There he was, once again sending gooey love signals
to China — “home to the world’s largest private solar research facility, and
the world’s fastest computer.”  And its limpid, lustrous eyes aren’t bad
either!
As Jim Hoft of Gateway Pundit notes,
“It was historic. Obama cheers Maoist song at White House State Dinner, Praises
Commie China in the State of the Union…All in One Week.”
America breathlessly awaits the day that Obama loves us with as much ardor
as he loves the communist Chinese.

 

Obama: Red China’s “Evolution” on Human Rights?

Obama: Red China’s “Evolution” on Human
Rights?

January 20th, 2011

Fred Lucas, CNSNews.com

President Barack Obama said on Wednesday that there has been “evolution” in
human rights in China over the last three decades, even though that country does
not allow for freedom of the press or freedom of religion, continues to imprison
political dissidents (notably Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo) and is run by
the Communist Party.
“And I want to suggest that there has been an evolution in China over the
last 30 years since the first normalization of relations between the United
States and China,” Obama said. “And my expectation is that 30 years from now we
will have seen further evolution and further change.”
During a joint White House news conference with Obama and Chinese President
President Hu Jintao, a reporter asked Obama, “Can you explain to the American
people how the United States can be so allied with a country that is known for
treating its people so poorly, for using censorship and force to repress its
people? Do you have any confidence that as a result of this visit that will
change?”
Obama said he and the Chinese president had discussed human rights at
length.
“China has a different political system than we do,” Obama said. “China is at
a different stage of development than we are. We come from very different
cultures with very different histories. But, as I’ve said before and I repeated
to President Hu, we have some core views as Americans about the universality of
certain rights–freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly–that
we think are very important and that transcend cultures.”
Read
more
.

Dispose of your fizzle material (the cartoon)

BOW TO CHINESE COMMUNIST

Barack Obama, Hu Jintao

AP Mon Apr 12, 6:49 PM ET

President Barack Obama greets Chinese President Hu Jintao during the official arrivals for the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, Monday April 12, 2010. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Poll: By 2-to-1 Margin, Americans Say U.S. Debt Owed to China Now Greater Threat than Terrorism

Poll: By 2-to-1 Margin, Americans Say U.S. Debt Owed to China Now Greater Threat than Terrorism
Sunday, March 07, 2010
By Christopher Neefus

(CNSNews.com) – By a two-to-one margin, American adults believe the amount of money the U.S. owes China to cover the U.S. national debt is now a greater threat than radical Islam.
 
According to a Zogby International poll, 58 percent said the debt was a greater concern, versus just 27 percent who chose terrorism perpetrated by “radical Islamists.”
 
The polling firm asked respondents: “When you think about the long-term security and well-being of the U.S., which of these do you believe is a more serious threat?”
 
Political ideology did not change the results significantly, the pollster pointed out.
 
“Interestingly, there was little variation by party identification with a majority of Democrats, Republicans and independents all agreeing that the debt owed by the United States to China poses the greater threat,” the Zogby report said. “Opinion was consistent across all other major demographic and politics sub-groups.”
 
Democrats barely strayed from the overall 58 percent-27 percent spread, with 57 percent of Democrats choosing the debt owed to China and 24 percent more concerned with Islamic terrorism. Likewise, independents broke 59 percent for the debt and 28 percent for terrorist attacks. The GOP followed suit, at 61-32.
 
Unsurprisingly, Republicans were more apt to choose one or the other as a serious threat, with just 2 percent (within the margin of error) choosing “Neither.” Conversely, 12 percent of Democrats said neither.
 
The GOP has made the skyrocketing debt a prime issue of late. After President Obama introduced his record $3.8 trillion budget for fiscal year 2011, which carried a record trillion-plus-dollar deficit, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said the new debt incurred was “astonishing.”
 
“This budget provides a startling figure that should stop us all in our tracks,” he said on the floor of the Senate.
 
“In fact, in just four years the administration predicts the government will have to spend more just to pay interest on the federal debt than it spends on the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, HUD (Housing and Urban Development), Interior, Justice, Labor, State, Treasury, and the Corps of Engineers, Environment Protection Agency, GSA (General Services Administration), NASA, National Science Foundation, Small Business Administration and the Social Security Administration — combined.”
 
After Democrats voted to increase the debt ceiling to more than $14 trillion to accommodate new spending, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), the ranking Republican on the House Budget Committee said on the floor that the House had “bequeathed the next generation an inferior standard of living.”
 
“I didn’t come here to make sure that my three kids are going to have a life that’s worse off than ours.”
 
Democrats, on the other hand, often say that deficit spending is the best way to spur new economic growth, and that the red ink of okay for the short term.
 
Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner appeared before the Senate Finance Committee to defend the budget in the first week of February and told members there was a “very strong economic case” for elevated government spending.
 
“Our basic test should be what’s going to add jobs, what’s going to add spark to investment, what’s going to provide good leverage for the taxpayers’ money, and we need to make sure we’re doing that in a way that’s fiscally responsible over the medium term,” Geithner said. 

Is China Headed Toward Economic Collapse?

Is China Headed Toward Economic Collapse?

November 11th, 2009 Posted By Pat Dollard.

picture1

Politico:

The conventional wisdom in Washington and in most of the rest of the world is that the roaring Chinese economy is going to pull the global economy out of recession and back into growth. It’s China’s turn, the theory goes, as American consumers — who propelled the last global boom with their borrowing and spending ways — have begun to tighten their belts and increase savings rates.

The Chinese, with their unbridled capitalistic expansion propelled by a system they still refer to as “socialism with Chinese characteristics,” are still thriving, though, with annual gross domestic product growth of 8.9 percent in the third quarter and a domestic consumer market just starting to flex its enormous muscles.

That’s prompted some cheerleading from U.S. officials, who want to see those Chinese consumers begin to pick up the slack in the global economy — a theme President Barack Obama and his delegation are certain to bring up during next week’s visit to China.

“Purchases of U.S. consumers cannot be as dominant a driver of growth as they have been in the past,” Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said during a trip to Beijing this spring. “In China, … growth that is sustainable will require a very substantial shift from external to domestic demand, from an investment and export-intensive growth to growth led by consumption.”

That’s one vision of the future.

But there’s a growing group of market professionals who see a different picture altogether. These self-styled China bears take the less popular view: that the much-vaunted Chinese economic miracle is nothing but a paper dragon. In fact, they argue that the Chinese have dangerously overheated their economy, building malls, luxury stores and infrastructure for which there is almost no demand, and that the entire system is teetering toward collapse.

A Chinese collapse, of course, would have profound effects on the United States, limiting China’s ability to buy U.S. debt and provoking unknown political changes inside the Chinese regime.

The China bears could be dismissed as a bunch of cranks and grumps except for one member of the group: hedge fund investor Jim Chanos.

Chanos, a billionaire, is the founder of the investment firm Kynikos Associates and a famous short seller — an investor who scrutinizes companies looking for hidden flaws and then bets against those firms in the market.

His most famous call came in 2001, when Chanos was one of the first to figure out that the accounting numbers presented to the public by Enron were pure fiction. Chanos began contacting Wall Street investment houses that were touting Enron’s stock. “We were struck by how many of them conceded that there was no way to analyze Enron but that investing in Enron was, instead, a ‘trust me’ story,” Chanos told a congressional committee in 2002.

Now, Chanos says he has found another “trust me” story: China. And he is moving to short the entire nation’s economy. Washington policymakers would do well to understand his argument, because if he’s right, the consequences will be felt here.

Chanos and the other bears point to several key pieces of evidence that China is heading for a crash.

First, they point to the enormous Chinese economic stimulus effort — with the government spending $900 billion to prop up a $4.3 trillion economy. “Yet China’s economy, for all the stimulus it has received in 11 months, is underperforming,” Gordon Chang, author of “The Coming Collapse of China,” wrote in Forbes at the end of October. “More important, it is unlikely that [third-quarter] expansion was anywhere near the claimed 8.9 percent.”

Chang argues that inconsistencies in Chinese official statistics — like the surging numbers for car sales but flat statistics for gasoline consumption — indicate that the Chinese are simply cooking their books. He speculates that Chinese state-run companies are buying fleets of cars and simply storing them in giant parking lots in order to generate apparent growth.

Another data point cited by the bears: overcapacity. For example, the Chinese already consume more cement than the rest of the world combined, at 1.4 billion tons per year. But they have dramatically ramped up their ability to produce even more in recent years, leading to an estimated spare capacity of about 340 million tons, which, according to a report prepared earlier this year by Pivot Capital Management, is more than the consumption in the U.S., India and Japan combined.

This, Chanos and others argue, is happening in sector after sector in the Chinese economy. And that means the Chinese are in danger of producing huge quantities of goods and products that they will be unable to sell.

The Pivot Capital report was extremely popular in Chanos’s office and concluded, “We believe the coming slowdown in China has the potential to be a similar watershed event for world markets as the reversal of the U.S. subprime and housing boom.”

And the bears also keep a close eye on anecdotal reports from the ground level in China, like a recent posting on a blog called The Peking Duck about shopping at Beijing’s “stunningly dysfunctional, catastrophic mall, called The Place.”

“I was shocked at what I saw,” the blogger wrote. “Fifty percent of the eateries in the basement were boarded up. The cheap food court, too, was gone, covered up with ugly blue boarding, making the basement especially grim and dreary. … There is simply too much stuff, too many stores and no buyers.”

Hussein Says Beijing’s Infrastructure “Vastly Superior To Us”, Translated From Ebonics, That’s “To Ours” – With Video

The Olympic Games: A Propaganda Victory for China?

The Olympic Games: A Propaganda Victory for China?

By FrontPage Magazine
FrontPageMagazine.com | 8/22/2008

Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Kai Chen, a victim of China’s Cultural Revolution who fled his home at the age of 15. He found salvation in basketball and rose to became a member of the Chinese National Team. He used this athletic skill to escape China and to eventually settle in the U.S. He is the founder of the Olympic Freedom T-shirt Movement and author of One In A Billion: Journey Toward Freedom.
 

FP: Kai Chen, welcome to Frontpage Interview.

Chen: Thank you.

FP: The current Olympic Games are being portrayed as a propaganda victory for China. Do you think that the Chinese government has succeeded in concealing the real nature of Chinese society from the international media? Has the international media attempted to look behind the new bamboo curtain?

Chen: The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is, and has always been, a corrupt organization. There has never been any control mechanism within that organization. It has paid only lip service on the human rights issues in China, and entirely ignored the illegitimate nature of the Chinese communist regime. In a big way, the IOC helps conceal the nature of the Chinese society – a post communist, but neo-Nazi society, and deceive the world as the Chinese communist regime intended to. I have to say that the IOC is a big sham in a big scheme to legitimize an illegitimate government. In some way the criminal communist regime has already succeeded in their deception from the start: President Bush was there, wasn’t he?

With countless violations and tragedies caused by the Beijing Olympics Preparation Organization under the Chinese government, have you ever heard IOC squeeze a f— toward the Chinese government. NBC which covers the Beijing Olympics, often using Tiananmen Square as the back drop, fails to mention Tiananmen Massacre in 1989. A deal somehow has been struck between IOC and NBC, wouldn’t you say so?

But the real nature of the Chinese society as a real issue will never go away. The criminal government with its countless atrocities against humanity in the past and present has caused more than 70 million innocent lives in peace time. That issue will never go away, unless God is blind. The current anti-humanity activities by the Chinese criminal regime is still continuing. Falungong, Tibet, Christians, dissidents, one-child policy, corruption, supporting all the criminal regimes and groups around the world from Darfur to Burma to North Korea to Latin America with weapons and money. The world has to wake up to the Chinese threat, a threat to our own conscience, an invasion of our souls.

FP: One of the submotifs of the Games is China’s apparent willingness to cheat to win. They hardly fielded a women’s swimming team because their swimmers, once dominant, were decimated by doping violations. And now there are allegations that they have altered the ages of their gymnasts in violation of international rules. What does this say about Chinese society?

Chen: Nothing surprises me or shocks me in China. When I represented China in many international situations, my passport was civilian, even though I was an army man. Though in the 1970, illegal doping was unknown in China, because the regime was ignorant about it, by the beginning of 1990s, with the import of many East German coaches, doping was instituted as a government program to many athletes, especially women athletes. But just like in East Germany, (all the doping scandals only came out with evidence after the collapse of the Berlin Wall) the Chinese doping scandals will be exposed only after the future collapse of the communist regime with its archives eventually opened to the public.

The moral issue facing the individual Chinese athletes is: Does anyone eventually come forward to confess to the world of their drug use (forced or voluntary) under the supervision of the communist regime. Do they really want to return their gold medals? Does the under aged gold medalist have the freedom and courage to defy the entire Chinese society, their own families, their own community to admit these violations? If not, what is the moral consequences they will have to bear in their entire lives?

FP: One of the stories of the Chinese Games–even though it has not been deeply probed by the media–is the environmental devastation of the Chinese environment. How deep a problem is it? Is it possible for any environmental movement (outside a governmentally sanctioned one) to take on these problems in the way that western environmentalists have in their societies?

Chen: By Western standards, China should be officially defined as uninhabitable. The pollution issue is so big that no one in China, in the Chinese government, and possibly in the world, wants to face it, for the bigger, more pressing issue to the regime is how to deceive the entire population, how to prolong their control over the Chinese people by spiritually drugging them, how to stabilize a fundamentally unjust society (an impossible task). Food must be on the table, unemployment must be kept to the manageable level, dissidents must be crushed, the increasingly restless population must be pacified. Pollution and environment damage? What pollution and environmental damage?

Quite a few teammates of mine have already died of cancer in their 40s and 50s. Are they going to find out what caused their cancer? Do they have the means to find out? Quite unlikely.

FP: Some analysts have said that the “openness” shown by the Chinese government in terms of media coverage of the earthquake, combined with the international media’s presence at the Olympics, will have a modest but permanent liberalizing effect on Chinese society. Is this so?

Chen: If there has been an “openness,” it is not because the Chinese government wants to open, but because they have to change their policies in order to maintain their control over the population. On the one hand, they will have to continue to attract foreign investment to keep the economy humming. On the other hand, they also will have continue to build the information “firewall” – a new kind Chinese Great Wall, to keep all threatening elements, such as Christianity, Falungong, ideas of freedom and democracy out of the reach of the Chinese people. They now have employed 200,000 internet police to monitor the society. They also hired countless “50 cent” propaganda amateurs to help “lead” the public opinions toward government side, by demonizing the West, America, Christianity, Falungong, and people like me. My email contacts were recently attacked with viruses systematically from an unknown source.

“Open” or “closed” is only a tactic in the hands of an illegitimate government, insecure about its own future for the crimes it has committed against the entire population over the past 60 years.

FP: As you look behind the imagery of the Olympics–undoubtedly glamorous, but also airbrushed and sanitized, according to critics of the coverage–what kind of society do you see?

Chen: China is a fascist and neo-Nazi society. No one nowadays, including members of the communist party, believes in the ideology of communism – an ideology discredited world wide with the collapse of the USSR. But the Party-State structure left by the previous founders such as Mao is still very much intact. To make Mao’s image everywhere in China, on the currency, in school campuses, on Tiananmen Square is a crucial government policy to numb the Chinese people’s senses. To dismantle Mao’s image, the National Anthem what espouses despotism, the National Flag that symbolizes individuals’ submission to the collective, and the entire communistic organizational structure is not a task the communist party will ever possibly engage itself in. It depends on the organizational structure to survive another few years.

Evil’s triumph is because not enough good people stand up. And no evil will disappear by itself.

FP: Kai Chen, welcome to Frontpage Interview.

Chen: Thank you.



In China, They Beat Christians With Crowbars

In China, They Beat Christians With Crowbars

The Summer Olympic Games will focus a needed spotlight on the Chinese government’s abusive treatment of believers.

 

Next week the world will see everything that’s good about China: Its sleek buildings, its new wealth and its talented artists and athletes. What won’t be on display during broadcasts of the Olympic Games in Beijing are any signs of religion—or of China’s brutal record of persecution aimed at Christians and other people of faith.
 
Some diplomatically minded evangelicals think this is not the time to rock the boat about China’s shameful record of religious repression. Franklin Graham told reporters in China earlier this year that believers should refrain from talking about their faith throughout the athletic contest. He thinks that we can best help China’s church by muting any evangelism efforts aimed at reaching athletes or the Chinese people.
 
But Bob Fu, who once led an underground house church in China and now leads the China Aid Association from an office in Philadelphia, has called Graham’s suggestion “offensive and inappropriate.” He told Charisma recently: “When an unjust law demands [Chinese Christians] to go against their faith and Jesus’ teaching of the Great Commission, they cannot and will not concede to a ‘faith moratorium’ in order to please an atheistic government during the Olympic Games.”

 

It would be a disgrace for the world community to ignore China’s brutal record of religious oppression.

 

Fu is one of five Chinese activists who met with President Bush at the White House this week to discuss China’s policies. At first Fu did not think Bush’s planned visit to the Olympics in early August would be helpful, but he told The Washington Post on Tuesday that he is now encouraged because the president plans to raise issues of religious freedom while in Beijing.
 
The controversy over China’s record of religious persecution is set against the backdrop of a rapidly changing nation whose leaders aren’t sure what to do about the growth of Christianity. Just a few decades ago, the communist government carried out a vicious plan to purge the country of religion. Today the gospel has spread from rural areas—where the revival began—and it is now touching intellectuals, politicians and the wealthy.
 
Modern China is a confusing study in opposites. It promotes capitalism on one hand and represses Tibetan Buddhism, various cults, and Christianity—except for churches that are registered with the state (and theologically controlled by it). China publishes millions of Bibles, yet most of them are exported or distributed only to state-sponsored churches. Christians in some regions are still beaten or thrown in jail for their faith, yet young members of the Communist Party are converting to faith in Christ—and finding more freedom of religion.
 
In Charisma’s in-depth cover story on China’s church, which hit newsstands this week, Australian journalist Adrian Brookes reports that more open-minded policies are bringing new freedoms to the Chinese church. But his interviews with underground leaders also showed that persecution has certainly not ended:
 
* In Hunan province, where the government is strictly communist and poverty is widespread, Christian groups are small and persecution is a reality. Some Christians in rural areas of Hunan and Anhui provinces have suffered horribly in the last 12 months as China prepares for the Olympics. One veteran missionary to China, Paul Hattaway, said this period “has been the most difficult for them since the severe persecution of 1983.”
 
* In other regions, the government is changing the way it cracks down on unregistered Christian groups. At one time the Religious Affairs Bureau (RAB) would raid church services and fine everyone. Now, the RAB is fining landlords who rent meeting space to churches.
 
* Things are changing fastest in the huge cities of China, where modernization has caused dizzying reforms. Christians who once feared being jailed say police now simply warn them to stop meeting. And during the recent earthquake in Sichuan province in May, there were reports that the government actually cooperated with churches in relief efforts—an unprecedented development.
 
* Dennis Balcombe, an American missionary who has worked in Hong Kong for 40 years, told Charisma that the government has actually become lax in its approach to Christians in Guangdong province. He said that police came and told leaders of one growing church that they should split their group in half so that it would not attract attention.
 
When I met with a group of 80 underground church leaders seven years ago in a secret conference near Guangzhou, I discovered that all of them had been jailed at least three times each. Many had been beaten with iron crowbars while others had been shocked with electric cattle prods in an effort to gain information about secret church groups. I met older leaders who had been confined in tiny concrete cells for as long as six months without a toilet.
 
And the sad truth is that this kind of brutal persecution still takes place today in many parts of China. Don’t let the fancy glass and steel stadiums built for the Olympics fool you. This is a government that still approves of beating Christians with crowbars.
 
I agree with Bob Fu that it would be a disgrace for the world community to ignore China’s brutal record of religious oppression. It would also be unforgivable for us to ask Chinese Christians to be quiet about their faith while their country is under global scrutiny during the games.
 
Because of their bravery in the face of martyrdom, Chinese Christians have set the standard for New Testament faith in our generation. Let’s pray for them during the month of August, and ask God that they will boldly declare the gospel no matter what laws Beijing has enacted to stop them.

 

J. Lee Grady is editor of Charisma. You can join him on Tuesday evening, Aug. 5 at 8 p.m. EST for a live conference call about the persecuted church in China. Joining him on the call will be Todd Nettleton, national director of the Voice of the Martyrs organization, and Bob Fu, a former pastor in China who now works to raise awareness of religious persecution in his homeland. To sign up for the call click here.

CIA: China’s military could get ‘adversarial’

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