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Barack Obama’s Chicago and George Bush’s Iraq

Barack Obama’s Chicago and George Bush’s Iraq

Thomas Lifson
The numbers tell the story. Via CBS2 Chicago:

CHICAGO (CBS) An estimated 123 people were shot and killed over the summer. That’s nearly double the number of soldiers killed in Iraq over the same time period.
Yes, yes statisticians, there is a difference in the murder rate of a city with a population just under 3,000,000 and soldiers on patrol or engaged in combat. 

 

The murders are concentrated in certain districts of Chicago, notably those on the South Side, which Barack Obama represented in the State Senate. Obama’s community organizing in Woodlawn (he worked for a Woodlawn group) doesn’t seem to have left a legacy of peace among the communards. In fact, the violence may be worse now than before Obama invaded from New York.

 

Who intervened and left a bigger and bloodier fiasco? George Bush in Iraq or Barack Obama in the Southside?

 

Hat tip: Ethel C. Fenig

The ‘conciliatory’ Barack Obama?

The ‘conciliatory’ Barack Obama?

Ed Lasky
NYT media “critic” Alessandra Stanley writes about the Bill O’Reilly Obama interview:

It was billed as the ultimate smackdown, and it certainly promised to be a wonk vs. wacko match: the cerebral, conciliatory Senator Barack Obama versus Bill O’Reilly, Fox News Channel’s most irascible, combative anchor: a commentator who calls liberals “loons” and “pinheads” and on Thursday’s show described reporters scrutinizing Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska as “sniveling, left-wing, wine-drinking, brie-eating.”
The topic was national security, and their tone was civil, but thankfully not too civil: Mr. O’Reilly, as is his wont, spoke brusquely, interrupted, argued and didn’t let his guest off the hook. He told Mr. Obama he had “bloviated” in parts of his convention speech, but congratulated him on his early opposition to the war, saying he had been “perspicacious.

 

Conciliatory? Did she hear his speech in Denver? His put-downs of John McCain? His railing towards Republicans and George Bush and Dick Cheney? She fictionalizes history.

 

And of course Bill O’Reilly comes in for some barbs from Ms. Stanley, who is clearly not a very conciliatory person.

 

How can a “journalist” write that “Barack Obama has talked to Fox News reporters quite a few times since the primaries began”? It became a running joke that Barack Obama refused to appear on Fox News for many months. Senator Obama even made it a point to note how he refused to appear on Fox News.

 

Once again, we see agenda-driven journalism.

The Oprah brand in jeopardy

The Oprah brand in jeopardy
Thomas Lifson
Oprah Winfrey and her TV staff are reportedly in turmoil over whether or not to invite Sarah Palin. The wrong decision would change the nature of her brand, transforming her into a perceived partisan and an implicit antagonist of a large segment of her female audience.

The Drudge Report writes:

Oprah Winfrey may have introduced Democrat Barack Obama to the women of America — but the talkshow queen is not rushing to embrace the first woman on a Republican presidential ticket!

Oprah’s staff is sharply divided on the merits of booking Sarah Palin, sources tell the DRUDGE REPORT.

“Half of her staff really wants Sarah Palin on,” an insider explains. “Oprah’s website is getting tons of requests to put her on, but Oprah and a couple of her top people are adamantly against it because of Obama.”

One executive close to Winfrey is warning any Palin ban could ignite a dramatic backlash!

That last executive is absolutely correct. In the wake of the infamous Us Magazine cover and the building backlash, Oprah had better be very careful indeed. Many, many women feel the media has been unfair. Half of all females in Survey USA’s latest poll think the media are favoring Obama.

If Oprah snubs Sarah, she will suffer enormous consequences. Her dilemma is that if she has Sarah on and lets her talk, her guy Obama will lose votes. And if she tries to put Sarah on the spot, she could lose fans in droves.
Posted at 12:08 PM | Email | Permalink

Barack Obama’s Chicago and George Bush’s Iraq

Barack Obama’s Chicago and George Bush’s Iraq

Thomas Lifson
The numbers tell the story. Via CBS2 Chicago:

CHICAGO (CBS) An estimated 123 people were shot and killed over the summer. That’s nearly double the number of soldiers killed in Iraq over the same time period.
Yes, yes statisticians, there is a difference in the murder rate of a city with a population just under 3,000,000 and soldiers on patrol or engaged in combat. 

 

The murders are concentrated in certain districts of Chicago, notably those on the South Side, which Barack Obama represented in the State Senate. Obama’s community organizing in Woodlawn (he worked for a Woodlawn group) doesn’t seem to have left a legacy of peace among the communards. In fact, the violence may be worse now than before Obama invaded from New York.

 

Who intervened and left a bigger and bloodier fiasco? George Bush in Iraq or Barack Obama in the Southside?

 

Hat tip: Ethel C. Fenig

Obama Camp Turns to Clinton to Counter Palin

Obama Camp Turns to Clinton to Counter Palin

 

ST. PAUL — Senator Barack Obama will increasingly lean on prominent Democratic women to undercut Gov. Sarah Palin and Senator John McCain, dispatching Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton to Florida on Monday and bolstering his plan to deploy female surrogates to battleground states, Obama advisers said Thursday.

Mrs. Clinton’s campaign event in Florida, her first for Mr. Obama since the Democratic convention, will serve as a counterpoint to the searing attacks and fresh burst of energy that Ms. Palin injected into the race with her convention speech on Wednesday, Obama aides said.

With the McCain-Palin team courting undecided female voters, including some who backed Mrs. Clinton in the Democratic primaries, Obama aides said they were counting on not only Mrs. Clinton but also Democratic female governors to rebut Ms. Palin — and, by extension, Mr. McCain. Those governors include Janet Napolitano of Arizona and Kathleen Sebelius of Kansas.

Still, within the Obama campaign and among Democratic officials nationwide, talks are well under way about how the party should treat Ms. Palin in the campaign — and what Mr. Obama and his running mate, Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr., need to do to regain the offensive after the Republican convention.

Some Democrats were urging Mr. Obama’s campaign not to underestimate the potential power of Ms. Palin’s speech, even among voters not aligned with either party: On liberal talk-radio shows and on left-leaning blogs, some Democrats said the Obama campaign should fight back hard to avoid being caricatured as Senator John Kerry was four years ago when he ran against President Bush. Some party strategists warned that Mrs. Palin’s personal narrative as a “hockey mom” with a special-needs child, would appeal to some undecided women voters.

“What McCain has done with Governor Palin’s nomination is aim right at a demographic that Obama needs to address quickly: noncollege-educated women,” said Mike McCurry, a former spokesman in the Clinton White House. “They need to maximize Biden’s ability to reach out to them, but at the end of the day, it is Obama who has to get that very, very critical group.”

Advisers to Mr. Obama predicted that the buzz over Ms. Palin would fade and that the race would quickly turn back into a contest between Senators McCain and Obama, despite the McCain campaign’s efforts to compare Mr. Obama’s experience unfavorably to Ms. Palin’s. At the same time, even as Democratic researchers pore over Ms. Palin’s record in Alaska, a rapid response team is being created in Chicago to dispatch female surrogates around the country.

David Axelrod, the Obama campaign’s chief political strategist, said Mr. Obama would not raise questions about Ms. Palin’s experience. Mr. Axelrod said the campaign would work instead to impress upon voters the seriousness of the race and continue to try to link the McCain-Palin team to President Bush.

While Mr. Obama did not aggressively challenge Ms. Palin, his advisers opened a new line of criticism to brand her as part of the Republican establishment.

“For someone who makes the point that she’s not from Washington, she looked very much like she’d fit in very well there when you see how she brings the attacks,” Mr. Axelrod said. “They all felt very familiar to Americans who are used to this kind of thing from Washington.”

Advisers to Mrs. Clinton said that she stood ready to help the Obama-Biden ticket, but they urged the campaign not to overestimate the impact Mrs. Clinton could have, noting that she had other commitments this fall, like campaigning and raising money for Senate candidates. Obama aides said the Clinton trip had been in the works before Ms. Palin was named the running mate.

Still, Mo Elleithee, a Clinton spokesman, said he believed she could make a difference with some voters who feel lost in the current economy and who want to see a federal role enacting universal health insurance.

“Anyone who was inclined to support Hillary Clinton typically did so because of her focus on middle-class, bread-and-butter issues,” Mr. Elleithee said. “Her message for Barack Obama on those issues could certainly help the Democratic ticket at the ballot box.”

The Obama camp also plans to keep Mr. Biden campaigning steadily in swing states. Obama advisers said that one advantage they had was that Mr. Biden, as a six-term senator and former presidential candidate, is well-prepared for his single debate with Ms. Palin, in October.

With both conventions seen largely as successes for their tickets, the importance of the three presidential debates — the first of which is Sept. 26 — and the one vice-presidential debate become even more crucial for either side to gain a political advantage, Democratic strategists and elected officials said.

Mr. Obama, speaking to reporters on Thursday at a campaign stop in York, Pa., brushed aside any worry that he might have about Ms. Palin’s criticism of his biography and political record in her convention speech.

“I’ve been called worse on the basketball court, so it’s not that big of a deal,” he said.

Yet Ms. Palin seemed to be on Mr. Obama’s mind. At a rally in Lancaster, Pa., Mr. Obama asked an audience of several thousand people if they had “caught any of the performances” at the Republican convention.

Mr. Obama did not mention Ms. Palin by name, but added, “They may have found some new faces to present their message, but it’s the same old message.”

Patrick Healy reported from Minnesota, and Jeff Zeleny from Pennsylvania.

Confirmed: Palin Speech Ratings, 37.2 million viewers

Confirmed: Palin Speech Ratings, 37.2 million viewers

Trying to confirm this comment over at Hot Air.

Update: The Chicago Tribune’s The Swamp confirms the news.

The Sarah Palin speech generated 37.2 million viewers, just 1.1 million viewers short of Barack Obama’s record-breaking speech on Day 4 of the Democratic Convention. The Palin speech was carried on only six networks while the Obama speech was carried on ten (including BET, TV One, Univision and Telemundo).

Whoa. Whoa. Astonishing numbers. This should be a huge story today.

Rudy Giuliani’s RNC Speech – Don’t Listen To Biden, It’s A Good One

Fight With Me! Ok Now ….. PANIC, Dem’s!

Explaining the “community organizer” joke to the outraged Left