‘Obama’s War on Democracy’

‘Obama’s War on Democracy’

Rick Moran

 

The
Washington Times
cuts through the verbiage and tells it like it is:

The public educators engaged in the demonstrations, many of whom
earn more than $100,000 in salary and benefits, seem to think the normal rules
of professional conduct do not apply to them. Many falsely called in sick to
engage in self-serving political activism, apparently without fear of being
disciplined. A group of Madison East High School students engaged in what a
union organizer called an “unplanned walkoff” of the school grounds, but that
the students said was organized truancy instigated by their teachers.
These demonstrations may be dramatic and TV-friendly, but White House
operatives and their union cronies are on the wrong side of history. The
American people are fed up with a sense of entitlement, waste and abuse in
government service. Americans in the private sector have lost jobs, been forced
to take pay cuts to continue working and have reduced spending just to make ends
meet. Government workers face no such jeopardy and instead enjoy automatic
raises, regardless of performance. The measures causing all the ruckus in
Wisconsin would require public-sector employees (excluding police and
firefighters) to contribute half of their pension costs and at least 12 percent
of their health care costs, which is a better deal than most Americans get. The
public sector employees also would lose collective bargaining rights for
anything other than pay. These are reasonable sacrifices to make in a time of
fiscal crisis, and by resisting them, the demonstrators expose themselves as
selfish and unreasonable.
The White House and its allies have backed similar demonstrations in Ohio and
Indiana, and more may be planned for other states. One can reasonably ask why
Mr. Obama is spending his time seeking to undermine democratic processes in U.S.
state legislatures and ignoring the pleas of Iranians trying to throw off the
shackles of Islamic rule.

The president has been more forceful in backing unions in Wisconsin than
freedom seekers in Iran. The difference is the Iranian protestors are useless to
his re-election effort. Obama can’t win without the lock-step support of the
teachers unions, so intervening in this ginned up demonstration against some
extremely modest proposals by Governor Walker – even though it is monumentally
unseemly for a president to take sides in this matter – makes perfect sense from
a partisan political perspective.

End Public Sector Unions…Period

End Public Sector Unions…Period

By C. Edmund
Wright

 

It’s about time.  I’ve been waiting for this debate to mature for 15 years.
The battles in Wisconsin and New Jersey over public sector union benefits
are merely financial precursors to a much bigger ideological war that has been
on the horizon now for years, if not decades.  When you acknowledge the coming
battle, you realize that Governors Walker and Christie — courageously as they
are behaving — are only nibbling at the edges of the real issue.
And the real issue is whether public sector unions should even be allowed
to exist.  Frankly, when even a modicum of common sense is infused into the
equation, the answer is a resounding no.  And the foundational reason is
simple.  There is no one at the bargaining table representing the folks who are
actually going to pay whatever is negotiated.
Gee, what could possibly go wrong?
Well let’s see what went wrong: California, New Jersey, Illinois, Michigan,
Chicago, New York State, New York City, Wisconsin…on and on I could go
including almost every city and state where government workers are
unionized.
Oh, and have you seen pictures of Detroit lately?
The problem is that our country has been lulled to sleep over decades of
hearing that government workers are dedicated and low paid public servants who
trade good pay for security.  And every time a union pay debate came up, it
seemed like only cops and fire fighters and teachers were mentioned.  No one
stopped to think that most government workers are actually bureaucratic charmers
like those we see at the DMV and other government offices — and not “heroic
teachers” or crime fighters.
But as long as the private sector was humming along, there was no reason
for reality to permeate that myth in most peoples’ minds.  But the reality is
that government workers long ago passed private sector workers in pay and
benefits, and now the compensation is more like 150% or even double, factoring
in all the benefits, including more vacation days than private sector workers
enjoy.  And of course, the inestimable value of job security remains intact and
strengthened — while all of us in the private sector deal daily with the
risk-reward constraints of reality that are only getting riskier.
And along the way — with a public school teacher-educated population that
understands virtually nothing about economics — the sheer idiocy of the concept
of government unions escaped almost everybody.  It’s almost as if the union
teachers were lying to their students about economics on purpose.
Consider: Unions exist primarily for the function of collective bargaining,
where the union bosses will negotiate on behalf of all the workers with the
management of a company over pay and benefits and other conditions.  This
built-in adversarial relationship along with the realities of a limited resource
– known as operating revenues — do a pretty good job for the most part of
keeping contracts in line.
The union bosses represent the workers.  Management represents everybody
else, including the stockholders, vendors, customers and potential customers of
the company.  In other words, management represents everyone whose interests are
served by keeping payroll costs down.
In the case of a government workforce, those whose interests are served by
keeping costs down would include all who pay taxes and fees to said government.
In other words, the universe of folks represented by management is far larger
than that represented by the union.  This inherent tension is the invisible hand
of reality that keeps collective bargaining in line.
However, public sector “collective bargaining” is a bad joke, given that
there are only chairs on one side of the bargaining table.  The bigger universe
of interested parties have zero representation in the process.  There is no
natural force working to keep costs in line.
Moreover, quite often the very politicians who are “negotiating” with the
public unions are politicians who have been financed by those same unions.  At
least Bernie Madoff ripped off his clients with some panache.  No such style is
even required in a public sector union negotiation when the folks in charge are
bought and paid for Democrats.
Under any circumstances and in any economy, it is simply a matter of time
before these costs reach a tipping point.  We are at that time.  There is simply
no more money to give to these public sector unions — period.
And that is why we are seeing what we are seeing in Madison this week and
it is why we have seen the emergence of Chris Christie as a national
phenomenon.  And I welcome it.  Things are finally so bad — that they are
good.  And by good, I mean that folks now cannot help but pay attention to the
issue of public sector unions.
I submit that the very existence of these unions has only been allowed to
happen because it’s the kind of issue an electorate is never forced to confront
– until they are forced to confront it.  And now they are.  There is, as
Charles Krauthammer said, a bit of an earthquake in the country.  People are
sensing that the nation is spinning off a cliff.
And of course it is, and public sector unions are one huge reason why.
This conclusion is inescapable.  And when you understand that, you understand
that public sector unions cannot be allowed to exist.  If they are, we will
never turn back from the cliff.
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